2012 Cannes Line-up

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Re: 2012 Cannes Line-up

Postby Sonic Youth » Thu May 17, 2012 10:05 pm

Paradise: Love
17 May, 2012 | By Allan Hunter
Screendaily

Dir: Ulrich Seidl. Austria-Germany-France. 2012. 120mins



The pursuit of happiness inevitably leads to disappointment in Paradise: Love (Paradies: Liebe), the first in a trilogy of tales from Ulrich Seidl focusing on three women from the same family. In Love, plump, fiftysomething mother Teresa heads to Kenya in need of love, affection and a renewed sense of her own desirability. Like Laurent Cantet’s Heading South (Vers Le Sud), Love underlines the way in which sex tourism is a form of neo-colonialist oppression but leaves the impression that no matter how striking the aesthetic, Seidl is really not telling us anything we don’t know already.

The unflinching approach to the subject matter will be recommendation enough for followers of Seidl’s previous work but a meandering, repetitive narrative is unlikely to broaden his audience. Seidl has built a career around investing fictional stories with a documentary-like search for emotional truth.

Love adheres to his methods of working without a traditional script and developing individual scenes from detailed planning and the interaction of professional and non-professional actors. In Love, that results in memorable, highly convincing naturalistic moments as Teresa discusses her desires and vulnerability with a giggly fellow sex tourist or bitterly confronts the reality of a country where love is a transaction rather than a genuine response of the heart.

It also creates a rambling, overlong film that just doesn’t grip sufficiently to overcome the predictability of the story. Margarethe Tiesel’s Teresa works with disabled people and endures her teenage daughter’s sullen manner and lazy habits. When she leaves Austria to join the “sugar mamas” on the beaches of Kenya, she feels a certain entitlement to her share of love and sex. In Kenya, she discovers a world where young black men will say and do almost anything to flatter and seduce older white woman as long as the price is right.

Her initial qualms are set aside when she meets Munga, a gentle charmer who makes her feel young and wanted once more. The illusion of love is quickly shattered as he requests money for his sister’s sick daughter and a succession of ailing relatives and equally worthy causes.

Disillusioned but undeterred, the more cynical Teresa continues her quest for pleasure with other men but can never quite escape her feelings of loneliness. Seidl captures the fleshy, saggy bodies of Teresa and her middle-aged friends with a style that falls somewhere between the jollity of Beryl Cooke and the unsparing eye of a Lucien Freud portrait.

Seidl retains a strong visual grip throughout with tableaux depicting the modest hotel entertainment in matching zebra print outfits or a sandy coastline with a firm line of demarcation between the beached whale tourists on the one side and the lean black beach boys on the other.

Seidl remains an impressive visual stylist and is also able to create a film with a balanced view of how sex tourism creates a sense of exploitation on both sides of the divide albeit one born from very different forms of desperation. There is a welcome complexity to his depiction of a situation in which the white female tourists are both arrogant and foolish and the black male residents are endlessly available and yet somehow stubbornly detached from it all.

Subsequent films in the trilogy will follow Teresa’s sister spiritual quest for happiness at a Catholic mission (Paradise: Faith) and Teresa’s daughter attendance at a diet camp for teenagers (Paradise: Hope).
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Re: 2012 Cannes Line-up

Postby Sabin » Thu May 17, 2012 1:06 pm

Jacques Audiard has a pretty solid record at Cannes and it's seems to be picking up momentum. His two features, A Self-Made Hero and A Prophet both won awards.
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Re: 2012 Cannes Line-up

Postby Sonic Youth » Thu May 17, 2012 9:34 am

Rust And Bone
17 May, 2012 | By Lee Marshall
Screendaily


Dir: Jacques Audiard. France-Belgium. 2011. 123mins



Packing arthouse style and widescreen emotional heft, Jacques Audiard’s follow-up to A Prophet pairs Marion Cotillard and Matthias Schoenaerts (last seen in Bullhead) in a tough, sexy and sometimes harrowing odd-couple love story that breezes confidently past a couple of slightly forced plot twists. Audiard’s films are always character driven, but in his last two outings the best characters have all been men. In Rust And Bone however, which is based loosely on a short story collection by Canadian writer Craig Davidson, he gives hot-property Cotillard the chance to shine alongside her robust co-star in a female role of impressive depth.

But this is a director’s film as well as an actor’s vehicle, in which soundscapes and soundtrack often drown dialogue; and if, deep down, the script has the bone-structure of a melodrama, this pedigree (or lack of it) is well hidden by an original eye for detail, some impressionistic camerawork and editing, and a world-class lesson in narrative minimalism.

Opening in France on the same day it premiered in Cannes, Rust And Bone has the potential to at least equal Audiard’s two previous films, both of which easily passed the million-admissions mark on home turf. It is likely to do well internationally too. Perhaps it lacks the genre crossover potential of A Prophet; but Rust And Bone is a big film in every sense, sure-footed, stylish and confident, that mainlines emotion into its audience.

Not much interested in its characters’ backstories, the film opens engagingly with what appears to be the end of a different story. Penniless Ali (Schoenaerts) and his five-year-old son Sam (Verdure) are leaving behind some trauma, heading south across France to an unnamed Cote d’Azur seaside town, where Ali’s supermarket cashier sister Anna (Masiero) lives with her lorry-driving husband in a run-down apartment. Leaving his sister to look after a son that he seems to consider a burden, muscular Ali gets a job as a nightclub bouncer – and it’s here, while breaking up a fight, that he meets Stephanie (Cotillard). There’s a spark, though neither particularly likes the other; he sees her as just another depressed rich girl looking for a bit of rough, while she has man-hating and self-hating issues, finding solace only in her day job – training killer whales and putting on shows at a local aqua park.

It’s a mark of the script’s rapid-fire bravura that it manages to roll the presentation of Stephanie’s job and the accident that changes everything for her into a single big-dipper scene, which comes too early on to be a spoiler. A shift of perspective at the crucial moment means we never really get to see what happened – did one of her whale charges sink its teeth into her? – but the upshot is that Stephanie wakes up in the hospital with both her legs gone. (They’re cut off and sewn up just below the knee – with some impressive CGI work saving Cotillard from making the supreme sacrifice in preparing for her role).

It’s refreshing here to see a film that presents, at least for a stretch, the opposite of the ‘you can do it!’ Hollywood inspirational healing process: Stephanie doesn’t want to do it, isn’t interested in physio, and is still sunk into a depression when Ali comes to see her in her disabled-access apartment. She called him, not the other way round – and she finds his indifference to her and her legless state both disturbing and oddly liberating (it’s a role reversal that even generates some humour when the two fall, much later, into an awkward sexual relationship).

The healing does come eventually; but the script keeps its foot firmly on the anti-schmaltz brake, first by stressing what a useless and occasionally violent father Ali is (he’s one of those unthinking father-kids that the Dardenne brothers have also explored), and second by revealing gradually the real damage that he does to the two women (Stephanie and Anna) who let him enter their lives for more than the space of a quick sexual grapple.

Increasingly assured in his deployment of sound and vision, Audiard shifts the point of view ably between characters, backing up the script’s own hints that we would do well not to invest too much sympathy in Ali, even if (like Stephanie) we find ourselves rapt by his insouciance and the ease with which he inhabits his fighter’s body. A scene in which Stephanie returns to the aquarium to commune with one of her whales and ‘conduct’ it with arm movements has a haunting power – not just because, like the deer scene in A Prophet, it puts our human troubles in perspective, but because this is a film about control – of one’s life, one’s partner, one’s son – and the limits of control. The soundtrack, which mixes now sombre, now more uplifting orchestral work by Alexandre Desplat with rock songs and ballads, washes over the dialogue on several occasions, nodding perhaps at Ali’s moral and emotional deafness but also, perhaps, the need to delve beneath the surface.
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Re: 2012 Cannes Line-up

Postby Sonic Youth » Thu May 17, 2012 8:00 am

Rust and Bone
By Peter Debruge
Variety.com


A tender yet heavily de-romanticized love story between a boxer with broken hands and an orca trainer with missing legs, "Rust and Bone" serves as an impressive if somewhat overblown exercise in contrasts, starring "Bullhead" breakout Matthias Schoenaerts and French siren Marion Cotillard as a pair whose daily fight for survival all but overwhelms the spark between them. Inspired by Canadian writer Craig Davidson's like-titled short story collection, Jacques Audiard's hyper-polished follow-up to "A Prophet" should enthrall its native Gaul, where it opens simultaneous with its Cannes premiere, before making a resilient run at U.S. arthouses via Sony Pictures Classics.

Inventing a fresh set of characters suggested by Davidson's terse pulp tales, Audiard and co-writer Thomas Bidegain continue a long tradition of French filmmakers trying their hand at the more typically American game of gritty, down-on-their-luck portraiture, in which boxers and lowlifes futilely attempt to claw their way upward while fate pushes back with all its cruel might. Schoenaerts' Ali is one such thug, just the latest in an oeuvre full of unconventional heroes from director Audiard (whose "A Self-Made Hero" and "A Prophet" previously won prizes at Cannes).

Ali appears sympathetic at first, if only because he's taken his 5-year-old son, Sam (Armand Verdure), whom his ex had enlisted to smuggle drugs, and moved in with his working-class sister (Celine Sallette) in Antibes. Ali picks up odd jobs here and there, working as a bouncer and a security guard before getting caught up with a shady boxing promoter (Bouli Lanners) who installs illegal surveillance cameras in discount chain stores.

One night at the club, he rescues the provocatively dressed Stephanie (Cotillard) from a brawl, driving her back to the apartment she shares with her overly controlling b.f. As in "Bullhead," Schoenaerts seems positively Neanderthal compared with the characters around him, and yet, there's something in his animal simplicity that Stephanie responds to. After an accident at her Marineland job leaves her a double amputee, she calls Ali, and their slow, surprisingly sensitive courtship begins.

Though unabashedly melodramatic, "Rust and Bone" resists many of the pretty comforts of the genre. For starters, she has no legs; seamless vfx allow her condition to be shown so often onscreen, the shock eventually fades. And when Ali proposes sex at a certain point in their relationship, the gesture serves only to fulfill their immediate urges. Indeed, there's something sub-human about many of their interactions, as if the impulses that drive them haven't been vetted by the usual gauntlet of social considerations. It's not even clear whether the couple belongs together, to the extent that the feel-good montage that caps the film very nearly betrays the rest of its worldview.

By French standards, the film is a massive undertaking, serving up a grueling yet dignified role for the country's hottest young starlet and an appropriately bull-headed showcase for Schoenaerts (who can also speak English and will soon be an international name). Though Audiard already commands respect, the film's cred is amplified by the involvement of the Dardenne brothers, who produced through their Les Films du Fleuve shingle.

Like Darren Aronofsky's "The Wrestler" a few years back, "Rust and Bone" blends Dardennes-esque naturalism -- handheld cameras; raw, tempestuous performances; squalidly realistic production design -- with more conventional plotting and compositions. Early footage of Ali and his son Sam evoke the Belgian sibs' "L'Enfant," revealing character through action and interaction, while later scenes -- as when a partly rehabbed Stephanie returns to the aquarium to visit the orcas -- have been orchestrated for maximum poetic effect.

This hybrid of almost docu-style observation and tightly scripted storytelling will seem invisible to many, and yet, it represents the direction in which romantic pics must evolve lest increasingly jaded auds dismiss them as phony. Like the odd blend of Alexandre Desplat's tender score with American top-40 music, the two parties in this particular couple seem so antithetical -- she's an elegant free spirit excited by dance and nature, while he seems scarcely more evolved than a gorilla -- the film never quite convinces that such a pair could exist, and during certain dramatic doldrums, even Audiard doesn't seem to know where things are headed.

Cotillard is the kind of actress whose eyes draw one into a place of deep identification, and though her character seems secondary to the dysfunctional father-son bond, this quality makes Stephanie the film's aching soul. Schoenaerts plays things more physically, keeping auds at arm's length while they try to guess what Ali is feeling, until the heart-wrenching moment when his blunt instincts prove the only thing that prevent fate's already harsh tribulations from spiraling into irredeemable tragedy.
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Re: 2012 Cannes Line-up

Postby Sonic Youth » Thu May 17, 2012 7:26 am

Rust & Bone: Cannes Review
by Todd McCarthy
Hollywood Reporter


A study of two disabled people—one physically, the other emotionally—and the extreme states to which they must be pushed in order to connect, Rust and Bone tells a relatively conventional story in a disciplined, unindulgent manner. Absorbing if somewhat predictable in its dramatic trajectory, Jacques Audiard’s follow-up to his powerhouse prison yarn A Prophet benefits from unvarnished, forthright performances from Marion Cotillard and Bullhead hunk Matthias Schoenaerts, as well as from the utterly convincing representation of the former’s paraplegic state.

Opening in France on May 17, the same day as its premiere in the Cannes competition, this high-profile French production, which Sony Classics acquired for the United States pre-Cannes, looks to generate solid commercial returns in most territories.

Returning to French cinema after a string of big Hollywood titles in the wake of her La Vie en Rose Oscar, Cotillard has been completely deglamorized here, appearing without makeup in frequently harsh light as Stephanie, a French Marineland whale trainer deprived of her legs in a terrible accident during a public performance. But the first half-hour concentrates more on Ali (Schoenaerts), sullen, impulsive and broke, who, his cute five-year-old son Sam (Armand Verdure) in tow, trains from the North down to Antibes to barge in on his sister Anna (Corinne Masiero) and her man.

Taking work, first as a bouncer at a club, where he helps Stephanie out after an altercation, then as a security guard, Ali is ill-equipped to tend to his son. Stifling uncharted depths of rage and frustration, Ali has boxed in the past and is drawn into back alley anything-goes fights, which quickly bring him some tidy earnings.

Audiard’s visual and dramatic approach is glancing, deliberately fragmented, marked by harsh contrasts between bright, bleached-out light and forbidding darkness. Charged emotions are felt and expressed but remain contained and not wallowed in. When Stephanie awakens in hospital after her accident and realizes what’s happened to her, the dreadfulness of her discovery is palpable. But soon enough it’s absorbed, to the point where she calls Ali to take her on an outing (to the Croisette in Cannes), where he takes her back into the water.

As much as both of these fundamentally solitary characters are in great need of help and emotional support, Audiard and co-screenwriter Thomas Bidegain hold back, presenting the main characters from the outside and keeping their deepest feelings implicit. It’s easy, of course, to imagine what Stephanie is enduring, although, all things considered, she bounces back relatively quickly, acquiring a set of mechanical legs that allow to get around, and even drive, before long. Avoiding the routine, the film pays little attention to her rehab, which proceeds without incident.

What Ali might be feeling remains uncertain, although the drama achieves a new focus after Stephanie and Ali discuss their sex lives and the latter bluntly volunteers to help her resolve her uncertainty over whether “it still works.” Lo and behold, it does, although this, too, is underplayed in favor of concentration on Ali’s fighting career, which Stephanie begins to find surprisingly alluring.

Although unstressed, the tenuous economic situation of Ali’s family and the gambling fight crowd is ever-present, as is anxiety over his appealing but so often ignored son. All the characters here are just one step from going over the edge and when they do, it’s a question whether or not anyone around them can find it within themselves to help them out.

Ultimately, Rust and Bone emerges as a study of human frailty and strength, the habitual tendancy toward the latter and the unexpected assertions of the latter. The polarities of Audiard’s storytelling and visual approach have been crafted to reinforce this dualty, with the film gathering focus and power in the second half.

With overt histrionics having been largely bridled by the director, Cotillard and Schoenaerts give heavily internalized performances marked by sporadic physical outbursts involving athletics and sex. Cotillard’s loveliest moments come late, as, emboldened by the beginnings of a physical and emotional reawakening, she wordlessly expresses Stephanie’s growing awareness of a potentially positive future for herself. For Ali, it takes a major trauma to penetrate his thick skull and turn his attitude around.

There is a gritty elegance to the filmmaking, while the soundtrack features a rich mix of Alexandre Desplat’s original score and many song selections.
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Re: 2012 Cannes Line-up

Postby Sonic Youth » Thu May 17, 2012 7:22 am

After The Battle
17 May, 2012 | By Fionnuala Halligan
Screendaily


Dir: Yousry Nasrallah. France-Egypt. 2012. 125mins


Yousry Nasrallah probes Egyptian society during the heated and heady days of last year’s revolution in Tahrir Square in After The Battle, a thinly dramatised vehicle for Nasrallah and his co-writer Omar Schama to air some fervid domestic debates.

Opting to funnel the polemic through the central character of Rim, a middle-class Cairo advertising executive turned impassioned NGO activist and Mahmoud, an impoverished and illiterate horse-rider from the Giza Pyramid village of Nazlet, Nasrallah never manages to lift his characters out of the plot schematic, despite a generous running time.

The result is a flatly shot mash-up of politics and drama that run side-by-side and are often individually interesting but never convincingly connect. While After The Battle (Baad El Mawkeaa) could find enthusiastic audiences at home in Egypt and other interested parties in the Arab world and diaspora (in particular co-production territory France), it will face tougher challenges outside that arena....


...Nasrallah bounces interesting ideas around his film, but few of them gain any real traction. Sections dealing with the role of women in this turbulent era in Egypt recall the more impactful and tightly focused Cairo 678, although the juxtaposition of the wall built in Nazret to keep the villagers away from the pyramids with the Cairo protests and Rim’s urban lifestyle is strong. Of the actors, Samra (The Yacoubian Building) is effortlessly convincing while Chalaby has a tougher character to make sense of. Production values here are adequate, with Nasrallah and cameraman Samir Bahsan turning in solid, no-frills work. Music is lightly applied.
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Re: 2012 Cannes Line-up

Postby Sonic Youth » Thu May 17, 2012 7:18 am

After the Battle: Cannes Review
by Deborah Young
Hollywood Reporter


It may be too soon to come to terms with the confused aftermath of the Arab Spring, a major undertaking that Egypt’s premiere director Yousry Nasrallah and scriptwriter Omar Schama tackle with intelligence and passionate boldness in After the Battle.

Set in the highly charged political atmosphere of today’s Cairo, the tale of a young middle-class woman activist and her reckless entanglement with a lower-class anti-revolutionary bursts at the seams with ideas and impressions lifted directly from Tahrir Square, breathlessly thrusting the viewer into the midst of current events. Though too excited and involved to balance history and fiction, the film has enough atmosphere and topical fascination to ride the wave of international curiosity in the region. It should translate into wide art house release, especially in Europe and Arab territories.

The film’s great merit is Nasrallah’s consummate story-telling, which allows non-Egyptian audiences an easy entry point into the familiar sight of thousands of demonstrators who, in February of 2011, were violently charged by horsemen in what has come to be known as “the Battle of the Camel.” The impetuous Rim (Meena Chalaby) goes with her friend Dina (Jordanian actress Phaedra) to distribute fodder to hungry horses in the ancient village of Nazlet, in the shadow of the Pyramids. Now that the tourists who once hired them have disappeared, the horsemen are so poor they can no longer afford to feed their mounts. Here she meets the strapping, guileless rider Mahmoud (Bassem Samra) and they exchange a forbidden kiss in the night.

Their promised affair fizzles, without completely dying out, when Rim discovers he has a family and tries to educate the lot to participate in the revolution. Tahrir Square has forever changed their lives, though not for the better, because Mahmoud was pulled off his horse while attacking the demonstrators and beaten. A video of his humiliation is on You Tube, for which his sons are mocked and beaten in school. His spirited young wife Fatma (Nahed El Sebai) just wants things to return to normal.

The characters are all complexly drawn to illustrate their vast social divide, and the scenes set in Nazlet go deep into the fabric of Egypt’s materially poor but humanly vibrant under-class, associated with the enduring sands and stones of Giza. Nasrallah manages to use the Pyramids as a natural backdrop to the action, and the inhabitants (jeered at as thugs and tomb-raiders by Rim’s middle-class friends) have an elemental relationship to the ancient world that recalls Shadi Abdel-Salam’s recently restored classic The Mummy, another film about Egyptians attempting to reclaim their history. Specifically, the locals want the government to knock down a concrete wall separating their village from the Pyramids and the tourists who are their livelihood – a wall that looks a lot like the one in Israel, sheltering tourists who no longer arrive.

While Chalaby’s Rim gives women’s issues a central role in the film, her brassy self-consciousness doesn’t earn sympathy points and borders on over-acting. Far more effective is Samra, who draws the emotional Mahmoud as a strong but tragic character in the neorealist mold. Riding his horse at a fancy dressage, he is shamefully banned as a jinx by the powerful local boss Haj Abdallah (stage actor Salah Abdallah), to whom he grovels and later begs for a job in a chillingly realistic scene. El Sebai’s Fatma has the same charming smile of subservience – their poverty is real and there is no room for noble attitudes with two kids and a horse to feed.
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Re: 2012 Cannes Line-up

Postby Sonic Youth » Wed May 16, 2012 7:53 pm

After the Battle
By Jay Weissberg
Variety.com


Moving beyond the one-dimensional us-vs.-them, now-vs.-then attitudes that instantly greeted and celebrated the Arab Spring revolutions, "After the Battle" focuses on the legacy of manipulation and issues like class, gender and corruption that still remain unresolved. Working on multiple levels, helmer Yousry Nasrallah mines popular cinema and artier forms through a seemingly simple story of two worlds, exposing hypocrisies in each. The pic resists pandering to either the international crowd or the local market, which means media buzz, along with its Cannes competition slot, will be vital for wide distribution.

There's an almost chameleonlike element to Nasrallah's use of various visual styles, ranging from the cerebral ("The Aquarium") to something more storybook-like ("Bab Al-Shams"), yet these differing modes are always connected by a refusal to treat his characters as anything other than complex beings. He and co-scripter Omar Shama aren't afraid to use an almost too-easy story of attraction or a certain Egyptian intensity of emotion here to expose the nation's multifaceted problems -- ones that don't go away with the toppling of a single dictator.

The "Battle of the Camels" took place in Cairo's Tahrir Square on Feb. 2, 2011, when men on horses and camels charged into the crowd of demonstrators, creating waves of panic and leading to deaths and widespread injuries. It became a PR disaster for the Mubarak regime, as video of its shocking mayhem went viral, and created a tsunami of disgust that ultimately helped bring down the government. "After the Battle" begins one month later, when self-confident NGO worker Reem (Menna Chalaby) joins her veterinarian friend Dina (Phaedra) in distributing feed to hard-pressed horsemen in the impoverished village of Nazlet El-Samman.

The people of Nazlet, next to the pyramids, have lived off the tourist trade, but fear of terrorism has killed off their livelihood. It's also home to most of the men who charged into Tahrir on horseback. While there, Reem is impressed by Mahmoud (Bassem Samra), a demoralized horseman whose misguided participation in the battle has left him and his sons, Abdallah and Momen (played by brothers Abdallah and Momen Medhat), ostracized, even by the animal-protection people.

Unaware of his family ties, the almost-divorced Reem is attracted to the troubled Mahmoud, and the feeling is mutual. Even after learning that Mahmoud has a wife, Fatma (Nahed El Sebai), Reem continues to frequent Nazlet, believing she's helping a family in need and furthering the goals of the Revolution. But Fatma sees through the privileged woman's naive conviction that she can bridge their two worlds, while Mahmoud looks to regain a semblance of dignity by sucking up to clan chief and local bigwig Haj Abdallah (Salah Abdallah), the very embodiment of corruption.

Just as Nasrallah knows Reem isn't alone in her well-intentioned but patronizing attitude to the workers in Nazlet, so, too, the helmer wants to make clear that Haj Abdallah isn't merely an isolated remnant of the previous regime, but rather an integral member of an entrenched old guard that shows no signs of going away. Early on during a discussion sponsored by Reem's NGO, a veiled woman says there's a difference between what's normal and what's right, whereupon she's scolded by outwardly liberated women for settling for "normal."

"After the Battle" is critical of both sides, uncovering attitudes shaped by decades of ingrained manipulation and prejudice. Reem's preachiness is part of the hypocrisy the film is set on exposing, though some auds may think she's Nasrallah's mouthpiece. As always in the director's films, misguided foibles (as opposed to outright ethical bankruptcy) aren't barriers to sympathy.

The three main leads are among Egypt's best and brightest, and casting is faultless. Samir Bahsan's fluid lensing and occasional simple setups, along with strong lighting, bring an air of melodrama undercut by the complexity of the issues being raised, many of which (like the pale-complexioned Reem being mistaken for a foreigner) are merely touched upon. Footage shot under Nasrallah's direction in actual demonstrations, as well as news clips, are nicely interpolated. The DCP projection at Cannes seemed tonally harsher than is probably intended.
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Re: 2012 Cannes Line-up

Postby Sabin » Thu Apr 19, 2012 7:10 pm

Yeah.
I like some of The Darjeeling Limited, but the minute they get off the train, it becomes wholly solipsistic. Not a fan. I like The Life Aquatic, but it took a moment to get there. It's quite good, but it's an acquired taste. Love the rest.

I'm optimistic but it looks like more of the same.
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Re: 2012 Cannes Line-up

Postby Sonic Youth » Thu Apr 19, 2012 6:45 pm

You mean, he's made some not-so-good movies in your view?
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Re: 2012 Cannes Line-up

Postby Sabin » Thu Apr 19, 2012 10:42 am

I'll plotz if it's good. :)
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Re: 2012 Cannes Line-up

Postby Sonic Youth » Thu Apr 19, 2012 10:04 am

Besides opening the festival, Wes Anderson's film is in competition. Sabin is plotzing right now.

The closing slot is usually a dumping ground, but this year it looks like a last-minute tribute.
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2012 Cannes Line-up

Postby Mister Tee » Thu Apr 19, 2012 9:29 am

There's some grousing, because people had hoped for the new Malick & PTA films as well. But, damn...there are some real names on this year's list.


Competition


Opening Film
Moonrise Kingdom, Wes Anderson

After The Battle (Baad el mawkeaa), Yousry Nasrallah

Amour, Michael Haneke

The Angels’ Share, Ken Loach

Beyond the Hills, Cristian Mungiu

Cosmopolis, David Cronenberg

Holy Motors, Leos Carax

The Hunt, Thomas Vinterberg

In Another Country, Hong Sang-soo

In the Fog, Sergei Loznitsa

Killing Them Softly, Andrew Dominik

Lawless, John Hillcoat

Like Someone in Love, Abbas Kiarostami

Mud, Jeff Nichols

On the Road, Walter Salles

The Paperboy, Lee Daniels

Paradies: Liebe, Ulrich Seidl

Post tenebras lux, Carlos Reygadas

Reality, Matteo Garrone

Rust and Bone, Jacques Audiard

Taste of Money, Im Sang-soo

You Haven’t Seen Anything Yet (Vous n’avez encore rien vu), Alain Resnais


Closing Film

Therese Desqueyroux, Claude Miller


Un certain regard


Antiviral, Brandon Cronenberg

Beasts of the Southern Wild, Benh Zeitlin

Confession of a Child of the Century, Sylvie Verheyde

Despues de Lucia, Michel Franco

11.25 The Day He Chose His Own Fate, Koji Wakamatsu

Le grand soir, Benoit Delepine, Gustave Kervern

Laurence Anyways, Xavier Dolan

Les Chevaux de Dieu, Nabil Ayouch

Loving Without Reason, Joachim Lafosse

Miss Lovely, Ashim Ahluwalia

Mystery, Lou Ye

La Pirogue, Moussa Toure

La Playa, Juan Andres Arango

7 Days in Havana, Laurent Cantet, Benicio del Toro, Julio Medem, Gaspar Noé, Elia Suleiman, Juan Carlos Tabio, Pablo Trapero

Student, Darezhan Omirbayev

Trois mondes, Catherine Corsini

White Elephant (Elefante Blanco), Pablo Trapero


Out-of-Competition

Hemingway & Gellhorn, Philip Kaufman

Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted, Eric Darnell, Tom McGrath, Conrad Vernon

Me and You, Bernardo Bertolucci


Midnight

Dario Argento’s Dracula, Dario Argento

The Legend of Love & Sincerity, Takashi Miike


Special Screenings

The Central Park Five, Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, David McMahon

Journal de France, Claudine Nougaret, Raymond Depardon

Les Invisibles, Sebastien Lifshitz

Mekong Hotel, Apichatpong Weerasethakul

Der Mull im Garten Eden, Fatih Akin

A musica segundo Tom Jobim, Nelson Pereira Dos Santos

Roman Polanski: A Film Memoir, Laurent Bouzereau

Villegas, Gonzalo Tobal


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