PGA Winners

For the films of 2011
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OscarGuy
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Re: PGA Winners

Postby OscarGuy » Sun Jan 22, 2012 5:16 pm

I will ONLY give you Brokeback Mountain.

Moulin Rouge only won National Board of Review and the Satellite and Globe awards for Comedy/Musical prior to and after the PGA.

The Aviator had only the BAFTA award, the Globe and Las Vegas/Phoenix critics.

Little Miss Sunshine only had the Spirit Award.

The Artist has several awards, including those from the New York, Washington D.C., Boston, Indiana, San Diego, Las Vegas, Detroit, Saint Louis, Phoenix, Vancouver and Broadcast Critics plus the Globe.

And the minute you bring up Crash with regard to it losing to Brokeback Mountain with the PGA, then perhaps you should consider that The Help was a far more PGA-friendly film. It was a box office smash hit. Crash barely made any money at all and was considered a commercial weakling. The Help had everything it needed to win the PGA award, but didn't. That should tell you something about the pull The Artist has on its audiences. Yes, The Help has Oprah pulling for it like Crash before it. But there's one thing Brokeback, Capote, Good Night and Munich didn't have: Harvey Weinstein.

Weinstein is the most formidable campaigner in Oscar history. Not since the early days of studio politics dealing out Oscars to save face and influence people or make deals has there been someone so in tune with Oscar voters that he can drag their votes out even with the most dubious selections. Like The King's Speech last year, Harvey finds a crowd-pleaser (or I should be more specific: Academy-pleaser) and turns it into a juggernaut. All through precursor season even while Social Network was drawing in the prizes, Speech slowly emerged as the ultimate winner, something we should have seen more vividly through the precursor season. This time, Harvey not only has a similarly pleasing film on hand, he has critics complicit in that love.

I know you want this to be a season where everything gets turned on its ear and surprises lurk around every corner. Those surprises end on Tuesday when a rather uniform slate with a handful of shocks makes its appearance. You may have some acting races that are all over the map, but there is one race that seems more clearly aligned to lock status (not locked yet, mind you, but close) than any other and that's Best Picture to The Artist.

And going back to the films you listed? Only The Aviator and Brokeback Mountain were even remotely considered contenders for Best Picture. To suggest Moulin Rouge or Little Miss Sunshine is to dismiss the current appreciation for and critical plaudits for The Artist. I would be happy to be wrong (I haven't seen the film yet, but I'm already sick of hearing about it), but I can't think of another film in the race at this point I'd like to see take it all. I'm rather uninspired by everything that's contending right now, so I'm not suggesting The Artist is the de facto winner out of some desire to see it win or to bolster its chances. I've seen the writing on the wall and I'm responding to it.
Wesley Lovell
"Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both." - Benjamin Franklin

ITALIANO
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Re: PGA Winners

Postby ITALIANO » Sun Jan 22, 2012 2:24 pm

Mister Tee wrote:
OscarGuy wrote:And the race is over.

Moulin Rouge. The Aviator. Brokeback Mountain. Little Miss Sunshine.

And Romney'll lock up the nomination by winning South Carolina.



Well, Mister Tee, with all due respect but... at this point, rather than just saying "no, no", you could say which movie will win Best Picture according to you. You may even turn out to be right, who knows, and at least I'll understand what's your point of view right now.

Plus, I mean, I know that it's not much liked on this board (they want "a message"), but you could do this big sacrifice and see The Artist. Your "no, no" would make more sense then.

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Re: PGA Winners

Postby Mister Tee » Sun Jan 22, 2012 1:28 pm

OscarGuy wrote:And the race is over.

Moulin Rouge. The Aviator. Brokeback Mountain. Little Miss Sunshine.

And Romney'll lock up the nomination by winning South Carolina.

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Re: PGA Winners

Postby OscarGuy » Sun Jan 22, 2012 8:47 am

And the race is over.
Wesley Lovell

"Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both." - Benjamin Franklin

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Re: PGA Winners

Postby Big Magilla » Sun Jan 22, 2012 6:11 am

List of Winners

•Theatrical Feature: The Artist
•Animated Feature: The Adventures of Tintin
•TV Drama: Boardwalk Empire
•TV Longform: Downton Abbey
•TV Comedy: Modern Family
•TV News: 60 Minutes
•TV Sports: ESPN’s 30 for 30
•TV Variety: The Colbert Report
•TV Documentary: American Masters
•TV Reality: The Amazing Race
•Web Series: 30 Rock Presents
•Documentary Feature: Beats, Rhymes and Life: the Travels of a Tribe Called Quest
“‎Life is a shipwreck, but we must not forget to sing in the lifeboats.” - Voltaire

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PGA Winners

Postby Big Magilla » Sun Jan 22, 2012 6:08 am

The Producers Guild of America gave its top prize to "The Artist" Saturday night, confirming the black-and-white film's status as an Oscar front-runner heading into the nominations for the 84th Academy Awards Tuesday morning. The PGA and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences have agreed on best picture winners the last four years.

Producer Thomas Langmann, the son of acclaimed French actor, writer and director Claude Barri, accepted the Darryl F. Zanuck Award for Outstanding Producer of Theatrical Motion Pictures for "The Artist," which took home the Golden Globe for best motion picture, comedy or musical, earlier this month.

Directed by Michel Hazanavicius, the film is a love letter to Hollywood's Golden Age, telling the story of the intersecting fates of silent film star George Valentin (Jean Dujardin) and plucky song-and-dance gal Peppy Miller (Berenice Bejo) at the dawn of the talkies. Since making its debut at the Cannes Film Festival last year, the movie has been collecting accolades and acclaim.

"When Michel and I dreamed of making 'The Artist,' we dreamed of writing a love letter to American cinema," Langmann said. "We just didn't know that we would get a taste of the American dream."

But "The Artist" wasn't the only recurring presence on the awards season circuit to take home a prize Saturday at the 23rd annual PGA Awards gala at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. Steven Spielberg's 3D performance capture film "The Adventures of Tintin," based on the work of Belgian artist Herge, won in the PGA's animated film category -- it, too, won a Golden Globe. The director accepted the statuette with his producing partner Kathleen Kennedy; "Tintin's" third nominated producer, Peter Jackson, did not attend the ceremony.

Spielberg, whose other 2011 feature, the stately World War I drama "War Horse," had been nominated alongside "The Artist," also was honored with the David O. Selznick Achievement Award in Theatrical Motion Pictures. In presenting the award, DreamWorks Animation chief Jeffrey Katzenberg said of Spielberg, "He's a great storyteller. He's maintained a deep affinity with his audiences."

During his acceptance speech, Spielberg credited his career to the fact that he came across producers who believed in him, refueled his confidence when it ran low and took a chance on him. He explained that an important aspect in making films is "being able to take chances on men and women who deserve a break. No one can succeed alone."

He continued, "For every film and television show nominated tonight, someone reached out and gave a hand. I am grateful to feel all of yours holding mine right now."

Actor Michael Rapaport certainly seemed both grateful and terribly surprised when his documentary about the groundbreaking hip-hop collective A Tribe Called Quest, "Beats, Rhymes and Life," took home honors for Outstanding Producer of Documentary Theatrical Motion Pictures -- Rapaport, Edward Parks, Frank Mele and Debra Koffler were the honored producers.

"I really can't believe we won," a visible shaken Rapaport said, before coming out with an off-the-cuff expletive.
“‎Life is a shipwreck, but we must not forget to sing in the lifeboats.” - Voltaire


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