2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

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Re: 2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

Postby Sabin » Tue Jul 05, 2011 4:50 pm

Cars 2 is doing fine. It'll make an obscene amount of money for Disney/PIXAR and there doesn't seem to be anything in its way until maybe Harry Potter. It's gross is heftier at this point than Cars 1. I don't think Kung Fu Panda 2 is going to win the Oscar. I don't know if Miyazaki has anything coming out but a film like The Illusionist would win this year, I think. I doubt we've heard of this year's Animated Film Winner. Maybe something at Berlin will emerge.

I didn't realize this but Larry Crowne had a meager production budget of $30 mil. It's being pushed very hard so ultimately the film needs to make about $60 or $70 to break even, but that shouldn't be difficult for a Tom Hanks movie overseas. It's not a dud like Green Lantern.
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Re: 2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

Postby MovieWes » Tue Jul 05, 2011 4:30 pm

rolotomasi99 wrote:I guess the good news is RANGO now has a better shot at the Best Animated Film Oscar. HAPPY FEET 2 and THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN are now the only competition.


Even better news for Rango is that The Adventures of Tintin is ineligible for the Best Animated Feature Oscar due to it being motion capture. However, I think that the front-runner at the moment is actually Kung Fu Panda 2.
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Re: 2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

Postby rolotomasi99 » Wed Jun 29, 2011 6:58 am

What kinds of topsy-turvey world do we live in when the latest Michael Bay film has a better RottenTomatoes score than the latest Pixar film? As of writing this, TRANSFORMERS 3 is beating CARS 2 with 36% vs 33%. It seems bad reviews can make a difference for adults when it comes to Pixar films. For CARS 2 to only make $6 m more on its opening compared to the first film is pretty bad when you account for five years of inflation and the 3D surcharge. From the imdb score, it seems word of mouth will not be very kind. Considering the heavy competition coming out in the next few weeks, CARS 2 might actually make less than $250 m. I sure hope it was worth it Pixar.

Through most of the year, TRANSFORMERS 3 had a release date of July 1. I was so worried it was going to beat THE DARK KNIGHT's opening weekend record. I know that record will fall eventually, but I just did not want it to be held by a Michael Bay film. However, they decided to continue the TRANSFORMERS tradition of opening mid-week. Despite everyone complaining about how bad TRANSFORMERS 2 was (even the director, writers, and stars acknowledged it sucked) something tells me it will not damper everyone's enthusiasm for this film. I would imagine it will repeat the last flick's opening pattern, with around $65 m its first day, $30 m its second day, and $110 over the weekend. Despite the many big films it will face down in the next few weeks, I am sadly sure this one will pass $400 m with a final total of $410 m.

The two counter programing movies will do what they can to entice the female moviegoers who have no interest in alien robot destruction. LARRY CROWNE looks like an odd little thing. I will never understand why heterosexual women are interested in seeing attractive women being with unattractive men. Tom Hanks was never handsome, but he had a harmless and sweet face. Now, age has taken the sweetness away and his body has gone saggy. Why would Julia Roberts want to sleep with that? Now sure but it would not be the first time a successful romantic comedy has centered around older and less attractive men winning over stupid women (most of them have involved Jack Nicholson). I would say LARRY CROWNE does around $20 m on its opening, and settles for $70 m total.

The other romantic comedy this weekend is aimed squarely at teen girls. MONTE CARLO looks like a film which would have been more comfortable on the Disney Channel than on the big screen. The young actors in the film have become famous through television. While romance only seems to be a small part of the film's story, there are enough young girls obsessed with that tall guy from that karaoke television show to give it an opening weekend around $10 m and a final total around $30 m.
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Re: 2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

Postby rolotomasi99 » Sat Jun 25, 2011 2:10 am

Sabin wrote:I have a friend who works at Disney who has said it's no secret that the reason they're making Cars 2 is for toy sales and additional merch. Ratatouille, Up, WALL*E...they did well, but there was no crossover to merchandising. It's not that Cars 1 was a success, it's that it made at least half a billion dollars all told. That's insane. That's so much money. Kids lost their fucking minds.

Next year, Disney is unveiling Brave, and in 2013 they are doing two films: Monsters University and something TBA. This is a calculating move. My buddy saw Cars 2 and said it's a fun spy movie that trades the lethargic emotions of Cars 1 for a sleek Bond veneer. I'll take that.


What quite a few critics are complaining about is the tow truck character, Mater, voiced by Larry the Cable Guy went from side character to co-lead. They really feel not only is it horrible to have to put up with more Larry the Cable guy, but the entire tone of the movie is informed by his style of stupid humor. Pixar did two great sequels for TOY STORY. There was no need for this to be bad. Not only did they sell their soul for the merchandising cash, but they turned in an inferior product. BRAVE better be fucking brilliant to make up for this mess. Luckily, I think it very well could be brilliant.

I guess the good news is RANGO now has a better shot at the Best Animated Film Oscar. HAPPY FEET 2 and THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN are now the only competition.
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Re: 2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

Postby Sabin » Fri Jun 24, 2011 2:15 pm

I have a friend who works at Disney who has said it's no secret that the reason they're making Cars 2 is for toy sales and additional merch. Ratatouille, Up, WALL*E...they did well, but there was no crossover to merchandising. It's not that Cars 1 was a success, it's that it made at least half a billion dollars all told. That's insane. That's so much money. Kids lost their fucking minds.

Next year, Disney is unveiling Brave, and in 2013 they are doing two films: Monsters University and something TBA. This is a calculating move. My buddy saw Cars 2 and said it's a fun spy movie that trades the lethargic emotions of Cars 1 for a sleek Bond veneer. I'll take that.
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Re: 2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

Postby rolotomasi99 » Fri Jun 24, 2011 5:34 am

Well, it has finally happened. Pixar’s streak is over. Since 1995 Pixar has released 11 films, and all have been financial and critical successes. Pixar has become more than just a studio, but a brand which signifies quality storytelling. What made Pixar so amazing was it felt like the people working there actually cared more about making a quality film than making money. Luckily, they were able to make both. Now it seems something has changed.
Most people agree Pixar has never made a bad film. Some films have been great, while others have just been good. However, most people agree from an artistic point of view, CARS is the weakest of the Pixar canon. It is the only Pixar film to score lower than 80% on RottenTomatoes, and is also the second lowest scored of their films on IMDB (behind A BUG’S LIFE). Like all Pixar films it was financially successful, but it became a particular revenue source for Pixar due to the ancillary properties – toys, lunch boxes, back packs, etc. It seems this, whether anyone will admit it, was the primary purpose for a sequel.
Well, I hope the folks at Pixar are happy with all the money CARS 2 will bring in because they are going to have to live with the fact that this film finally broke Pixar’s lucky of having released only critical acclaimed films. CARS 2 has a horrible RT score of 39%. That is below bad animated films like GNOMEO AND JULIET (55%), SHREK THE THIRD (41%), and the two ICE AGE sequels (57% and 45%).
I know to some this may all seem over the top, but I really am sad about Pixar releasing a bad film. It feels like an era is over. Maybe their next film, BRAVE, will be so amazing it will help return them to their former glory, but CARS 2 will always be the blemish on their otherwise strong reputation.
From a commercial viewpoint, I am sure CARS 2 will do well. The first film debuted to $60 m and earned $240 m. With the goodwill from TOY STORY 3, the 3D surcharge, and the lack of competition for family audiences, I think CARS 2 will have a solid opening in the neighborhood of $80 m. Pixar films have always done so well because they entertain boys and girls, young and old alike. However, CARS is much more popular with little boys than little girls, and very unpopular with adults. I think this will keep it from breaking out as much as the biggest Pixar hits. With TRANSFORMERS 3 on Wednesday, CARS 2 is going to have heavy competition for the attention of the young boy audience. With THE ZOOKEEPER and THE DEATHLY HALLOWS competing for the general family audience a few weeks later, CARS 2 is probably going to have one of the most front-loaded openings of any Pixar film. I think it will end somewhere around $275 m. I hope it makes even less, but I know that is unlikely.

The other release this weekend is another R-rated comedy. BAD TEACHER was originally going to be dumped in the summer badlands of August, but after the huge success of THE HANGOVER 2 and the surprise success of BRIDESMAIDS the film was moved to late June to ride the raunchy comedy wave. Given the bad reviews and no big comedy names, I doubt this film will find the success of the two summer comedies. It will have a $20 m opening, with a $60 m total.
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Re: 2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

Postby Sabin » Sun Jun 19, 2011 6:31 pm

Green Lantern 3D Ticket Sales was especially disappointing, and I believe that subconsciously a lot of audiences are going to shiver at the thought of a 3D Michael Bay movie.

Anyway as everybody by now knows, Green Lantern is one of the true lame spots of the summer. Reviews are abysmal with 25% (!!!) on RT and it pulled in $52 mil over the weekend, yet dropped quite a bit day by day. The Friday to Saturday was down 22%. That's horrible. The film cost $200 mil, but by all accounts this is a lie. A combination of post-production costs and P&A will push the total amount spent on it to $300 mil. However, that doesn't take into account what this turkey put out in toys and video games. Basically, The Green Lantern needs well over $350 mil worldwide...which it's not going to get any kind of close in revenue here. Overseas, yes, this film will make its money back, but it will end up being one of those "financially successful failures".

Super 8 dropped 40% this weekend for $21 mil. That raises its total to $73 mil. On a $50 mil budget (with likely $30 - $50 mil in P&A), it's already doing pretty well. It hasn't really started overseas and really the only selling point there is Steven Spielberg, so we'll have to wait and see. It's going to be a solid hit.

This isn't a proud weekend for Jim Carrey for many reasons, most especially that there is is a movie called Mr. Popper's Penguins period now on his resume. It's not that he's being set up to fail, but rather that other projects keep falling through and there's nothing he can really do but aim for a double. It opened to $18 mil. On a $55 mil budget, this isn't quite as bad as some would think, but it's still a bit sad. Next week Cars 2 is coming out, so that's pretty much over and done with. Foreign ticket sales haven't started yet, but they're likely to be fairly positive. All things considered, it will do all right when all is said and done, by which I mean it will take in more than $70 mil around the world...but it's not going to do anything to help Jim Carrey's career. The fact that he's got a movie made is something though...

X-Men: First Class dropped another 50% for $11.5 mil, raising its cum to $120 mil, and...ooh, it's going to be interesting watching this film slowly climb itself forward towards the finish line. It's already turning out to be one of the warmer received summer movies of the year and there doesn't appear to be much ill-will towards it, but it is struggling to emerge from its title of lowest grossing X-Title. Overseas, its already grossed $160 mil+, so by definition its already on its way, but it's not a solid hit, and sadly it reinforces the need for a name actor an a previously established character.

The Hangover No Colon Part II is up another $10 mil, dropping 45%, for a gross of $232 mil is still the year's biggest hit domestically with another $260+ mil overseas. On a how-did-they-spend-that $80 mil budget, it's huge.

Kung Fu Panda 2 dropped another 40+% for $8 mil. It stands at $143 mil on a $150 mil budget not including the $50 mil+ spent on P&A. Overseas ticket sales have raised its international gross to almost $500 mil, but this is pretty much it as it careens into Cars 2 this weekend.

Another week, another mild 25% drop for Bridesmaids which is now at $137 mil. It's one of the few movies this year that has made everybody fairly proud.

Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tide is at $220 mil. Judy Moody and the NOT Bummer Summer is at a flailing $11 mil, and Thor hangs below the Top Ten with $176 mil.

Midnight in Paris opened up on 94 more screens this weekend, and dropped 10% for $5 mil. I don't want to read too much into the 10% drop. I guess there's nothing negative there. Midnight in Paris is starting out as the new date movie of the summer. It's at $21 mil domestic and worldwide it stands at $40 mil-ish. That's pretty good. It seems to just be getting started. Y'know. By Woody Allen standards.
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Re: 2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

Postby Sonic Youth » Fri Jun 17, 2011 2:26 pm

3-D extravaganzas haven't been Hollywood saviors
Michael White, Ryan Flinn
Bloomberg News


Comedies and dramas filmed in the old-fashioned two-dimensional format are leading Hollywood's summer box-office revival, calling into question studios' investment in more costly 3-D extravaganzas.

The season's biggest surprises include Universal Pictures' "Fast Five," a 2-D action film that relied on car chases and shootouts to generate $206 million in U.S. ticket sales. Big performers also include a pair of raunchy comedies, "The Hangover Part II" and "Bridesmaids," and last weekend's science-fiction thriller "Super 8."

Studios are finding that slapping 3-D technology onto a film doesn't guarantee audiences, and relying on the technology can be a drag on the stock. Production in the format grew after James Cameron's "Avatar," released in late 2009, became the top-grossing movie ever. In the rush to capture premium 3-D ticket prices, Hollywood made films without mastering the technology, said Jeff Bock, an analyst with Exhibitor Relations Co.

"Attendance has been falling off for three years, and 3-D was supposed to be the savior," Bock said. "With the 3-D rush jobs we've had over the past two years, people are getting an inferior product."

Among the recent 3-D disappointments are "Kung Fu Panda 2," which drew 45 percent of its U.S. opening-weekend audience in 3-D, and "Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides," with 46 percent. Globally, Walt Disney Co.'s "Pirates" is the year's biggest-grossing picture with a haul of $907 million.

Investors have punished shares of companies whose fortunes are tied to 3-D's success. DreamWorks Animation is down 16 percent on the Nasdaq Stock Market since the May 26 opening of "Kung Fu Panda," which sold a smaller percentage of 3-D tickets than previous DreamWorks movies.

RealD Inc., the Beverly Hills provider of 3-D exhibition equipment, has dropped 26 percent in the past month on the New York Stock Exchange, and San Francisco's Dolby Laboratories Inc., a smaller competitor in the format, is off around 10 percent over the same period.

The percentage of box-office sales tends to vary widely depending on whether audiences believe 3-D adds to the experience, according to Martin Pyykkonen, an analyst with Wedge Partners.

"Avatar" generated 71 percent of its opening-weekend sales from 3-D showings, according to Rich Greenfield, an analyst with BTIG. Audiences conditioned to watching the "Pirates" movies didn't consider 3-D essential to the story, Pyykkonen said.

Closing the gap

Warner Bros.' "Hangover," the year's biggest-grossing movie to date in the United States and Canada with $220 million, No. 2 "Pirates" and "Fast Five," in third place, have helped to close the gap in ticket sales from last year. The year-to-date decline has narrowed to 8 percent from 15 percent since the May 1 start of Hollywood's traditional summer season, according to research firm Hollywood.com Box-Office.

Bock has predicted that the domestic box office will hit $11 billion this year, up from $10.6 billion in 2010, in part because of the extra $3 or so per ticket moviegoers pay for 3-D and Imax Corp. widescreen viewings.

The ticket price may have been too high in some cases, Chase Carey, chief operating officer of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp., said on a conference call in March.

Producing a film in 3-D can add as much as 30 percent to the budget for a live-action movie and as much as 20 percent for animation, Pyykkonen said.

'Green Lantern'

More is on its way. Warner Bros.' "Green Lantern," with Ryan Reynolds starring as the DC Comics character, is expected to generate $50 million in ticket sales domestically when it opens this weekend and $135 million during its theatrical run, according to BoxOffice.com. The 3-D film cost about $150 million to make, Internet Movie Database estimates.

Director Michael Bay's "Transformers: Dark of the Moon" may rekindle enthusiasm for the format, said Pyykkonen.

Audiences are drawn to Bay's heavy use of visual effects, just as they are to Cameron, who spent a decade developing the camera system and techniques used to film "Avatar," Pyykkonen said. That movie generated $2.78 billion in global ticket sales for News Corp.

"Dark of the Moon," the third in Bay's series about a race of robotic aliens, is set to be released on June 29 by Paramount Pictures and stars Shia LaBeouf and Rosie Huntington-Whiteley.

"It will be the next interesting test as to what the market really thinks," Pyykkonen said. "Does the buzz build and say, 'Hey, you've got to go see this because of the 3-D.' "

Growth rate

Studios plan to release about 34 movies in 3-D this year and 38 next year. Pyykkonen estimates that as many as 44 3-D films will be distributed in 2013 and said he expects the quality to improve.

"If you think of this in the longer term, this is going to work and it's going to be taken for granted," Pyykkonen said. "The growth rate may be slower."

One other element in 3-D's favor is that the format is popular outside the United States and Canada. Foreign sales account for about two-thirds of the global box office for many of Hollywood's big-budget films and more than 75 percent for some, including "Pirates." The global box office reached $31.8 billion in 2010, an 8.2 percent increase, according to the Motion Picture Association of America.

"Internationally, the percentages are way higher" for 3-D ticket sales, said Michael Lewis, chief executive officer of RealD. "The industry is spending a lot of energy figuring out how to maximize the potential of 3-D. This is still a relatively new medium."
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Re: 2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

Postby rolotomasi99 » Fri Jun 17, 2011 7:09 am

If the weekday boxoffice is any indication, SUPER 8 is going to pass $100 m but not go much farther than that. It is already behind DISTRICT 9 at the same point, and that film only made $115 m. SUPER 8 and X-MEN: FIRST CLASS both receive the strongest reviews of any summer action/adventure film, yet they can only do the minimum expected of them. Very sad.

Now we have what looks like to be the worst of all the summer action films (second only to TRANSFORMERS 3). From the very first trailer, GREEN LANTERN has looked awful. Cheesy but not in a fun and campy sort of way. Some of the f/x look amazing, and then other times they look awful. I predict this will be the first big budget flop of the summer (PRIEST was too small potatoes to count as a flop). THOR was a surprise hit despite the character being second tier in the comic book universe, but GREEN LANTERN seems like even more of a risk. From what I have read, the character has a very rabid fan base but is not part of the top tier characters like Batman or Superman. Plus, the reviews are vicious. If this movie somehow make more money than the well reviewed X-MEN: FIRST CLASS I will be truly pissed off at the idiot masses. Anyhoo, I think maybe a $45 m opening and then a quick drop, with a total gross of $120 m.

The trailer for MR. POPPER'S PENGUINS looks like it is two hours of torture, but I am sure it looks great to little kids. You have Jim Carrey acting all silly and somehow still being upstaged by some adorable penguins. With all the advertisements I have been seeing, I am sure many parents will be dragged to this thing by eager little tykes. I think a $35 m opening is very possible, and if they kiddies like it as much as it seems they will it could end up with a final gross around $130 m. CARS 2 will offer up some competition, but I still think this film will do quite well. Hell, it may even have the slightest chance of beating GREEN LANTERN this weekend, though the 3D film usually wins.
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Re: 2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

Postby Sabin » Sun Jun 12, 2011 2:02 pm

That's a terrible idea.
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Re: 2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

Postby Greg » Sun Jun 12, 2011 1:55 pm

Sabin wrote:And then at eleven is Tree of Life. It's now on 47 screens gaining 27 more and it took in just under a million dollars. Costing $32 mil, I have to say I'm not quite sure what Fox Searchlight is doing. Word of mouth is going to end up being...very Malick. Why not just put it out there and as close to its Palme d'Or win as possible? Its per-screen average is $18,000/screen. Overseas it's already made $11 mil.

I dunno...


Fox Searchlight has scheduled The Tree Of Life to go into wide release July 8. It will be quite interesting to see its United States box office after that.

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Re: 2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

Postby Sabin » Sun Jun 12, 2011 12:46 pm

Well, it's official. Super 8 "overperformed" with $38 mil over the weekend. On a $50 mil budget with likely close to the same in P&A, it's a hit. And likely also a grower. Although I find it incredibly disappointing, I think there's a very good chance it could end up one of the ten nominated this year.

X-Men First Class dropped only 55% in its second weekend, which isn't that bad. Basically, the film needs to make between $175 to $200 mil to be considered any kind of a hit and right now it stands at $99 mil. I'm dubious that it can do that. Maybe it'll come close.

Next is The Hangover Part II with $18.5 mil dropped 41% in its third weekend. It stands at $217 mil total. It's one of the hits of the summer.

One of the disappointments is Kung Fu Panda 2 which dropped 30% for $17 mil this weekend. It stands at $127 on a $150 budget. With P&A costs likely between $20 - $30 mil, it needs to at least make another $50 to be considered a hit. Foreign ticket sales are much stronger.

Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides is the biggest movie of the year nobody I know went to see. I'm not joking. Anyway, it made $11, dropping 40% giving it a $209 mil gross thus far. It cost $250 mil and likely another $50 or so on P&A. Although it's something of a disappointment here, it's foreign sales are over $600 mil so far, making it the front-runner for biggest movie of the year. Hard to complain about that. America has spoken though, and they are kinda over Jack Sparrow.

Bridesmaids is closing in on the title of biggest Apatow Joint so far. It dropped a measly 16% for $10 mil, raising its total to $124 mil. Costing $32.5 with likely a mid-budget on P&A, it's the surprise hit of the summer that anybody could have predicted.

There is a movie out called Judy Moody and the NOT Bummer Summer which took in $6 mil. On a $20 mil budget, it looks to be underperforming in the wake of Kung Fu Panda 2 and will likely screech to a halt once Cars 2 comes out. The trailer looks like the most evil fucking thing in the world.

Midnight in Paris gained +797 screens, is now on more than Vicky Cristina Barcelona was ever on, and it grabbed $6 mil, which is more than Vicky Cristina Barcelona ever made, though in its opening weekend on 692 screens it made $5.6 mil. However at $30 mil, Midnight in Paris costs twice as much as Vicky Cristina Barcelona did. It currently stands at almost $15 mil. Having just recently expanding, grabbing very warm word of mouth, and with very little else out there for adults, it should do just fine and hang in theaters for the rest of the summer. If Vicky Cristina Barcelona was Woody Allen's "Biggest Hit In Years", Midnight in Paris should remove those quotation marks when it takes the title. It's going to be huge overseas and a gross more domestically than any Woody Allen movie since Hannah and Her Sisters.

Rounding out the top ten, Thor grabbed $2 mil raising its total to $174. On a $150 mil budget with likely $50 in P&A, it needs to make around $200 mil to be a hit. Foreign sales are over $250 mil already, so it's pretty much at the tail end of its run as an early summer hit. I see it finishing around $190 mil. That's going to end up between Captain America and X-Men: First Class. Fast Five grabbed almost another $2 mil raising its total to $205 mil. On a $125 mil budget with a mid-level P&A budget and $373 in foreign sales, it's a ridiculous cash cow.

And then at eleven is Tree of Life. It's now on 47 screens gaining 27 more and it took in just under a million dollars. Costing $32 mil, I have to say I'm not quite sure what Fox Searchlight is doing. Word of mouth is going to end up being...very Malick. Why not just put it out there and as close to its Palme d'Or win as possible? Its per-screen average is $18,000/screen. Overseas it's already made $11 mil.

I dunno...
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Re: 2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

Postby Sabin » Fri Jun 10, 2011 2:16 pm

This is likely a conversation more for the X-Men: First Class thread, but there is truth in what you're saying. Batman Begins' numbers were certainly affected by the shittiness of the Schumacher films. So it's possible that X-Men: First Class was affected as well.

I'm not one of those people who thinks it's a misreading of X-Men mythos. While there are some truly wonky decisions, this is what the X-Men are all about. What I take issue with is the notion that this is truly an ensemble piece. It's absolutely not! While it is an ensemble, so many characters seemingly crucial to the film are just anonymous with arcs that feel subliminal. And I think that degree of remove in the third act will genuinely affect viewers' enjoyment of the film. Magneto's voice is definitely prominent and there's something kind of strange about that too, staging an anti-hero as the lead in a film of such sunniness.

I think I had the same reaction to the first X-Men movie, though slightly more positive. It was a dumber film but the pleasures were more palpable. It was far more fun. X-Men: First Class might play better on DVD, hopefully with an extended running time.
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Re: 2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

Postby OscarGuy » Fri Jun 10, 2011 12:54 pm

I think X-Men will build solid word of mouth. The people who didn't go see it opening weekend were likely skeptical after they were disappointed by Wolverine and Last Stand.

And I'd say X-Men: FIrst Class works because there WASN'T one central character. I agree with Hollywood Z who posted on my main site that First Class's success is that it's a true ensemble piece, which is what the X-Men comics are about. While one hero might take a slightly prominent role in each issue, it's the dynamic and interaction of the ensemble that strengthens the source material. We had minor and major characters in First Class, but I'd say Magneto/Xavier are probably the central characters with Magneto edging in the dominance race. So I would contend that while it is centered around developing multiple characters, Magneto acts as a strong central voice.
Wesley Lovell
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Re: 2011 Box-Office Predictions - Where we follow the money

Postby Sabin » Fri Jun 10, 2011 11:31 am

It's worth noting that saying "one of the best reviews of the summer" doesn't really mean anything anymore because reviews tend to skew kinder these days towards films that are blissfully not inept. I'll say that about X-Men: First Class...which I haven't seen the new Pirates, it must be miles above it. However, the critical mass is very much in the "B" range, and that's because there isn't an amazing central character to root for like Wolverine. Audiences' response to the film represents their reservations towards seeing in the first place.

I hadn't thought about what might win this coming weekend. I think Super 8 probably has to. If it was any other film, I'd say no, but it's X-Men: First Class. Most everybody who will see it already did. I see a pretty week opening ahead of us.
"If you are marching with white nationalists, you are by definition not a very nice person. If Malala Yousafzai had taken part in that rally, you'd have to say 'Okay, I guess Malala sucks now.'" ~ John Oliver


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