83rd Academy Awards Nominations

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Postby OscarGuy » Tue Feb 22, 2011 10:19 pm

Ok. I've finished up all but Let's Pollute now, since it can't be found anywhere.

I do like The Lost Thing, but I still love Day & Night more. Too bad they are both nominated in the same year...Lost Thing would be a surefire choice for me in any other year. As for Madagascar, it's a film with striking visuals, but it's lack of plot doesn't make it that engaging.
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Postby Big Magilla » Mon Feb 21, 2011 4:06 am

Easily the best of the lot.

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Postby danfrank » Mon Feb 21, 2011 2:51 am

You can find The Lost Thing here.

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Postby OscarGuy » Sun Feb 20, 2011 10:51 pm

They get deleted for copyright reasons. If the Day & Night one were on YouTube, it would also have been pulled, but it wasn't.

I have only managed to watch a couple of those and I think Day & Night is pretty special and so far is better than both The Gruffalo and the snippet of Let's Pollute that's there.
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Postby Damien » Sun Feb 20, 2011 5:36 pm

Mister Tee wrote:Is that actually all there is to Let's Pollute? I was thinking it was just an excerpt.

Yes, it actually runs about 6 minutes. The filmmaker apparently took it down and just left up the beginning.

Yesterday afternoon, The Lost Thing was there in its entirety -- don't know why it was deleted.




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Postby Mister Tee » Sun Feb 20, 2011 4:25 pm

Is that actually all there is to Let's Pollute? I was thinking it was just an excerpt.

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Postby Kova » Sun Feb 20, 2011 11:32 am

I've seen all 5 of the Animated Short nominees. You're not missing much. My favorite was The Lost Thing which, unlike the other nominees, had both a compelling narrative and an interesting visual style. My guess is that The Gruffalo will win, though I can't imagine anyone over the age of 5 not checking their watch constantly throughout.

Madagascar is gorgeous to look at, but not much more than that. I don't get the fuss over Day and Night--maybe it was more interesting in 3D.

And how Let's Pollute got a nomination will forever remain a mystery to me.

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Postby Big Magilla » Sat Feb 19, 2011 11:04 pm

The only one I'd seen before is Day & Night. The Lost Thing has been removed. Let's Pollute is short enough to get through, but I couldn't get through the others either.

I'll just have to assume whatever the Academy picks will be what deserves to win. :cool:

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Postby Damien » Sat Feb 19, 2011 10:17 pm

You can see 4 of the 5 nominees for Animated Short Subject here, I couldn't get through any of them in its entirety.

http://www.i-flicks.net/blog....nimated
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Postby MovieWes » Thu Feb 03, 2011 10:22 pm

Sonic Youth wrote:And although I don't mean to pick on you, I can't let the inconsistencies of your statements go. On the one hand you say Social Network "picked up every nomination it was expected to" (Garfield excepted), and on the other hand say it managed to get three nominations that "nobody expected". At the rate you're downgrading the film's prior expections, it won't be long before The Social Network is remembered as the surprise Best Picture nominee.

I don't think that there was anything inconsistent in my statements. All I said was that all the categories The Social Network was widely expected by everyone to show up in (Picture, Director, Actor, Supporting Actor, Adapted Screenplay, and Editing) it showed up in with the exception of Andrew Garfield in Supporting Actor. I won't say that I was completely surprised by its inclusion in Cinematography and Original Score -- these were aspects of the film which were widely praised -- but neither were a sure thing. But I wouldn't go so far as to say that "nobody expected" The Social Network to show up in those categories.

That said, I'm not going to let you get away with putting words in my mouth. I said that nobody expected it to show up in Best Original Score. I never mentioned Cinematography or Sound Mixing (I am, of course, assuming that you meant Cinematography and Sound Mixing. The only other two categories I said nobody expected it to show up in were Art Direction and Costume Design, and well... it wasn't nominated in either of those categories). I'm not gonna lie, however. I am pretty shocked that it was nominated for Best Sound Mixing, even though it was cited by the CAS (The King's Speech, to me, remains an even bigger shock and is indicative of how close the race actually is).

However, regarding Original Score, I probably should've been clearer in my wording. What I meant to say was that prior to the Academy's announcement that it was eligible for Original Score, most people expected that it would be deemed ineligible as the Academy has a history of declaring the cooler, more modern, and more innovative scores ineligible for stupid reasons (see There Will Be Blood and Clint Eastwood's recent scores). Even after it won the Golden Globe for Original Score, there were a lot of people who wondered if the Academy would be hip enough to actually go ahead and nominate it. But I also believe that there were a some people (myself included) who predicted that it would be nominated for Best Original Score. Same thing with Best Cinematography. What I should've said it was that it never a "sure thing" in those categories. That it was nominated for Oscars in those three categories shows that it does have plenty of support throughout the Academy. I mean, let's be honest here. Is The Social Network really the kind of film that the Academy typically recognizes in these categories?

Of course, I'm writing this from the mindset I had last week before Tom Hooper won the DGA award over David Fincher. The King's Speech is looking like a much more solid contender to me now than when I wrote my previous statements. I'm still not 100% convinced that it's going to win Best Picture, but it's looking much, much stronger than The Social Network at this point. I guess that The Social Network could still have a last minute surge, but its window of opportunity is shrinking rapidly. I do believe that the race is much closer than the guilds indicate it is, and I honestly wouldn't be surprised if DGA was decided by just a few votes. Even now, I'm absolutely convinced that David Fincher is still frontrunner for the Best Director Oscar in spite of Tom Hooper's victory this past weekend. And even though I'm leaning more towards The King's Speech as the eventual Best Picture winner, I think that it's completely absurd to declare the race over when we have a film like The Social Network that has won Best Picture and Best Director from every single critics group in existence. I've said it before, but there has never been a film to win Best Picture AND Best Director from the New York Film Critics Circle, the Los Angeles Film Critics Association, the Boston Society of Film Critics, the Chicago Film Critics Association, the Broadcast Film Critics Association, the National Society of Film Critics, and the Golden Globes to lose the Oscar for Best Picture. On the other hand, I'm also pretty sure that there's never been a film to win DGA, PGA, and SAG to lose Best Picture either (and I'm aware that the guilds -- moreso DGA and PGA than SAG -- matter a whole lot more to a film's Oscar chances than the critics awards do). However, for a film to win Best Picture without receiving a single major critics award or Golden Globe outside of the acting categories would be unprecedented. I mean, even Crash won Best Picture from the Chicago Film Critics Association. Braveheart won Best Director from the HFPA and BFCA. Titanic won Golden Globes for Best Picture and Director.

But we still have the WGA and the ACE Eddys to go, and I'd be floored if The Social Network lost either of those awards. And if it somehow wins the ADG award for Contemporary Art Direction over Black Swan... well, I think we might still have a race on our hands.




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Postby Sonic Youth » Fri Jan 28, 2011 9:15 pm

MovieWes wrote:Last night, everyone was predicting The Social Network to win Best Picture. This morning, it picked up every nomination it was expected to with the exception of Andrew Garfield,
It was always a foregone conclusion that The King's Speech had far more opportunities to be nominated than The Social Network. The King's Speech is a film that was, by its very design, destined to rack up a bunch of Oscar nominations. I don't think that anybody ever expected The Social Network to show up in the Art Direction or Costume Design categories and it's not as if its cast was populated by a bunch of distinguished, classically trained British thespians. There is nothing at all surprising by the 12 nominations by The King's Speech.
Nobody expected it to be nominated for Best Original Score because it was too "modern" for the music branch's taste, but it is now one of the frontrunners in the category. I'd say that Best Sound Mixing, as I mentioned earlier, is an indication of its widespread support.

Sorry for the delayed reply.

Maybe it was "expected", "a foregone conclusion" and "nothing at all surprising" to you. It was the opposite to me. I've not been following the critic's awards or guild awards at all this year (except I did watch the Golden Globes... how could I not?) . But I was still aware that The Social Network was landsliding all the precursors. Eight nominations is very good, but it looks a little anemic behind The King's Speech's twelve and True Grit's ten. Plus, it didn't pull through with a Garfield nomination. From an indisputable and highly publicized front-runner, I expect a stronger showing. And I find a Garfield snub to be of greater consequence than a nomination for Sound Mixing. If the situation were reversed - Garfield but no Sound Mixing - Social Network would look like a stronger candidate to me. As for twelve nominations for TKS, that's exactly what I'd expect a well-received historical British epic to recieve. Except TKS ain't epic. It's a small-scale and intimate, and not something I'd have pegged for a twelve-fer.

I didn't know all the stats and expectations before nomination morning. So I'm speaking strictly from the unique (at least here) perspective of a non-Oscar hobbyist, which is what most movie-goers are. In the non-virtual world, just about every woman I know is talking about The Black Swan. Most people have already seen True Grit. And yeah, The Social Network was the "Have you seen it yet?" film for a good while. But that can only last for so long. It's now The King's Speech's turn to play the role of primary conversation starter. Anyone who hasn't seen it yet wants to. You may say this is all anecdotal and meaningless. These are just my friends and social acquaintances, and it's ridiculous to use them as a barometer. True... but not necessarily so. We don't have the same perspective as a Hollywood industry insider, but the insiders do see what we see. And Tuesday morning, we saw The King's Speech in all the news headlines, standing head-and-shoulders above all the other contenders. And when the weekend is over, we'll see The King's Speech dominating the box office news even if it isn't the number one movie. This is nothing to dismiss. The growing word-of-mouth may well end up being the tail wagging the dog. Whatever support The Social Network had in the precursors, I insist these new developments are indications of fresh support, and maybe greater support, for a movie that's easier to cuddle up to. The Social Network peaked; the groundswell for The King's Speech is just getting underway.

And although I don't mean to pick on you, I can't let the inconsistencies of your statements go. On the one hand you say Social Network "picked up every nomination it was expected to" (Garfield excepted), and on the other hand say it managed to get three nominations that "nobody expected". At the rate you're downgrading the film's prior expections, it won't be long before The Social Network is remembered as the surprise Best Picture nominee.




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Postby anonymous1980 » Thu Jan 27, 2011 8:54 pm

There's a good reason why Black Swan didn't get a nod for Costume Design. As it turns out, the head credited costume designer, Amy Wescott, did NOT design the ballet costumes, the fashion design sister duo Rodarte did. It probably cost her a huge chunk of votes when this little factoid leaked.

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Postby rolotomasi99 » Thu Jan 27, 2011 2:55 pm

Apropos of nothing, if you want some quick giggles, take a look at these 5 very short films of kids reenacting Best Picture nominees. BLACK SWAN, 127 HOURS, THE FIGHTER, THE SOCIAL NETWORK, and THE KING'S SPEECH all get skewered. I thought THE SOCIAL NETWORK parody was the most spot on, but all of them were clever.

http://tv.gawker.com/5744041....d-films

Also, all ten Best Picture nominees depicted by Lego's is hilarious. BLACK SWAN in particular made me laugh.

http://gawker.com/5744988/the-best-picture-oscar-nominees-in-lego/




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Postby Big Magilla » Thu Jan 27, 2011 3:15 am

MovieWes wrote:
Big Magilla wrote:I've always thought that because films set in the past generally employ more artisans - designers, set builders and other craftsmen - than do contemporary films and that's what entices people in the Academy who are not actors, writers or directors, to vote for them in the hope that their success will encourage producers to make more such films and maybe employ them.

It never occurred to me that voters in artisan jobs would vote along these lines. I guess I just thought that voters voted for the films they liked best, not those that employed a lot of people. I was under the impression that it was the revenue generated from box-office and DVD sales that encouraged producers to make the more lavish and/or tech-heavy films, not accolades.

Oscar nominations drove box office receipts which encouraged producers to make more epics, giving jobs to more people.

In the studio days, studios dictated to their employees which films to vote for - there was even bargaining between studios such as the infamous deal between Louis B. Mayer and Jack Warner in which Mayer agreed to tell his employees to vote for Paul Muni for Best Actor for The Story of Louis Pasteur in exchange for Warner's agreeing to have his people to vote for The Great Ziegfeldl for Best Picture. Of course it was all to Mayer's benefit as Muni's next film was The Good Earth on loan-out to MGM.

Despite all the shenanigans, I think most Academy members vote for the film they feel most emotionally attached to. Sometimes, though, the shenanigans wins out.

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Postby Eric » Thu Jan 27, 2011 1:08 am

rolotomasi99 wrote:
Eric wrote:
rolotomasi99 wrote:I guess he is going to have to just suck it up and make a Holocaust film or period piece if he wants to be nominated.

Or he could start making movies that are even remotely as good as even Spielberg's worst popcorn movies.

If you want more movies like 1941, THE TEMPLE OF DOOM, and THE LOST WORLD, than I totally understand why you do not like Nolan. In fact, it is actually a compliment to him for you to say his movies are not "good" since you clearly have a very bizarre definition of what a "good" movie is.

No, I don't like Nolan because he directs pompous, ersatz "intelligent" movies that make cretins think they've seen the entire script flipped, not because he didn't direct 1941.


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