The Bourne Ultimatum: The Poll

The Bourne Ultimatum

****
0
No votes
*** 1/2
4
21%
***
6
32%
** 1/2
5
26%
**
1
5%
* 1/2
2
11%
*
0
No votes
1/2 *
0
No votes
0
1
5%
 
Total votes: 19

Okri
Tenured
Posts: 2529
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 3:28 pm
Location: Edmonton, AB

Postby Okri » Fri Aug 29, 2008 11:59 pm

I just saw it (finished rewatching the trilogy, actually), and I have to admit, I was quite impressed. I voted *** 1/2.

User avatar
OscarGuy
Site Admin
Posts: 12379
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 12:22 am
Location: Springfield, MO
Contact:

Postby OscarGuy » Fri Feb 01, 2008 11:40 am

The Original BJ wrote:Example: Late last night I added the post below. When I woke up this morning, this thread was the THIRTEENTH from the top, despite the fact that barely any of the others actually had any new posts, just poll votes.

Here's a tip. At the top under the space where it says "Welcome X", you'll see Your Control Panel and a bunch of other options, then New Posts. If you click on New Posts, it will show you ONLY the topics that are new, which includes poll, but it helps consolidate and make easier finding the newest posts.
Wesley Lovell
"Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both." - Benjamin Franklin

The Original BJ
Emeritus
Posts: 4015
Joined: Mon Apr 28, 2003 8:49 pm

Postby The Original BJ » Fri Feb 01, 2008 10:34 am

Example: Late last night I added the post below. When I woke up this morning, this thread was the THIRTEENTH from the top, despite the fact that barely any of the others actually had any new posts, just poll votes.

The Original BJ
Emeritus
Posts: 4015
Joined: Mon Apr 28, 2003 8:49 pm

Postby The Original BJ » Fri Feb 01, 2008 2:08 am

Nice to see that there are quite a few of us who don't think Paul Greengrass is the anti-Christ.

An entertaining movie. What I like about the Bourne films is that, while their set pieces rival those of the Bond franchise, there's a gravity here that gives the film's themes of government corruption, global politics, and terror much more resonance.

Granted, we're not talking Munich, but for a summer blockbuster, it's a giant cut above most. Plus, this is the rare trilogy where each film got better, IMO.

Sabin
Laureate
Posts: 7140
Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2003 12:52 am
Contact:

Postby Sabin » Thu Jan 31, 2008 2:06 pm

I think 'The Bourne Ultimatum' is pretty sweet. The script is really sharp, the action scenes are outstanding, and even if the denouement is a little pat, by that time I was pretty grateful for any movie to move forward at such breakneck speed for such duration of narrative.
"If you are marching with white nationalists, you are by definition not a very nice person. If Malala Yousafzai had taken part in that rally, you'd have to say 'Okay, I guess Malala sucks now.'" ~ John Oliver

Mister Tee
Laureate
Posts: 6192
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 2:57 pm
Location: NYC
Contact:

Postby Mister Tee » Thu Jan 31, 2008 11:36 am

I think you can make a case that in terms of story (obviously not dialogue), Gilroy did better screenwriting here than he did with Michael Clayton.

dws1982
Tenured
Posts: 2870
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 9:28 pm
Location: AL
Contact:

Postby dws1982 » Wed Jan 30, 2008 11:45 pm

A very solid ***.

It started off to me as just an entertaining chase film with a screenplay on autopilot but that mid-film plot twist (which I won't give away) showed that they had been about three steps ahead of me the entire time, and that the screenplay was never on autopilot in the first place.

And of course the car chases were fun.

anonymous1980
Laureate
Posts: 5037
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 10:03 pm
Location: Manila
Contact:

Postby anonymous1980 » Wed Jan 30, 2008 1:10 pm

One of the most overrated of the summer blockbusters.

User avatar
OscarGuy
Site Admin
Posts: 12379
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 12:22 am
Location: Springfield, MO
Contact:

Postby OscarGuy » Wed Jan 30, 2008 11:56 am

vote and discuss.
Wesley Lovell

"Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both." - Benjamin Franklin

Mister Tee
Laureate
Posts: 6192
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 2:57 pm
Location: NYC
Contact:

Postby Mister Tee » Sat Aug 11, 2007 3:37 pm

The Hate-Greengrass Club might as well ignore what I write here. (Their minds are frozen closed, anyway) I think Bourne Ultimatum is terrific -- the most exciting thriller I've seen in many a moon, and easily the most pleasurable movie of the summer.

This despite the fact that, while I may not make it all the way up to Sonic's level of "hate", I found much to dislike in the preceding Bourne Supremacy. In that film, I thought the pyrotechnics were way out of kilter -- scenes seemed sliced and diced simply for the sake of more cutting. Compounding the problem, the various scenes had little compelling dramatic logic: particularly the last one, a long, crash-'em-real-good car chase that meant noting and took us nowhere. THe overall effect was decadent violence for its own sake.

None of these faults is, for me, present in the new film. There's plenty of jittery editing, but all to keep moving sequences along; I didn't get that "it's moving too fast/what the hell is going on?/I'm nauseous" feeling I so often had in Supremacy (with two, quite minor exceptions: the very tail end of the lengthy Desh-pursuing-Nikki segment, and some of the NYC car chase). Even more important, this film has a dramatic focus that guides virtually every moment of the narrative -- Bourne zeroing in on his origins, CIA folk trying to stop him getting there -- that gives existential heft to even the most exquisitely choreographed action sequences.

And those sequences truly ARE the movie. After the early Waterloo Station sequence was complete, I started to think to myself, that was a terrific scene -- but another (the Madrid office encounter) was underway almost before I could articulate the thought. Bourne's quest is by now at such a focused level that we jump from one sequence to another, still feeling emotionally engaged (possibly because we carry the exposition that was handled in the earlier films).

And, happily, unlike in the second film, this quest reaches a climax. Bourne uncovers the secrets of his past; nothing is withheld for a sequel. And what he uncovers has real resonance for a contemporary audience. It's odd: the first Bourne film was shot prior to the Trade Center attack -- and Ludlum's books of course are from decades earlier. But Bourne's discovery -- that his well-meant desire to do things necessary to protect his country (think Pat Tillman) were perverted by ruthless overlords -- couldn't feel more timely. (As well as the fact that it's some within the system -- Landy, Nikki -- who collaborate to help right things)

I could have done without the last second or two of the film; Nikki's smile was enough to make the ending happy, and I preferred the ambiguity of the floating body. But that's a small quibble (though the studio will pobably take it as an invitation for some hacks to keep the story going. Why? It's all been told). This is, as I say, a terrific film; it reminded me a bit of the kick The French Connection gave many of us all those years ago. Highly recommended.

User avatar
MovieWes
Professor
Posts: 2019
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 12:33 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas, USA
Contact:

Postby MovieWes » Mon Aug 06, 2007 8:12 pm

"The Bourne Legacy" Already Planned?

With the exception of the first half of "The Bourne Identity," none of the films in the mega-popular 'Bourne' series have followed the three best-selling Robert Ludlum novels - despite using their titles. This Summer's upcoming "The Bourne Ultimatum" only continues that trend it seems.

Thus it comes as no surprise that according to the Associated Media, the producers are planning to continue the franchise with "The Bourne Legacy," and Matt Damon is expected to collect the biggest payday of his career - a cool $20 million upfront plus significant profit participation. The offer has gone out apparently, but no word as yet as to whether Damon will sign the deal.

One other key difference will be this time the film will actually borrow elements from the book, penned by Eric Van Lustbader. Notably used will be the villain, a Hungarian named Stepan Spalko who is planning a bacteriological attack on a meeting of world leaders in Iceland.

Also to be included, albeit somewhat altered, will be a subplot about Spalko's personal assassin Khan - a young man who may in fact be Bourne's own son and one who has grown up to resent the father who abandoned him.
"Young men make wars and the virtues of war are the virtues of young men: courage and hope for the future. Then old men make the peace, and the vices of peace are the vices of old men: mistrust and caution." -- Alec Guinness (Lawrence of Arabia)

Big Magilla
Site Admin
Posts: 15324
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 3:22 pm
Location: Jersey Shore

Postby Big Magilla » Mon Aug 06, 2007 5:18 pm

MovieWes wrote:
criddic3 wrote:Is this really the "third and final" film of the franchise?

Aren't there more books than that? Couldn't they make more movies? Did Matt Damon say that he wasn't going to do any more?

There are only three Jason Bourne books by Robert Ludlum. However, Eric Van Lusterbader, with permission by Ludlum's estate, has written two more Bourne novels, "The Bourne Legacy" and "The Bourne Betrayal". I'm not sure if Universal has any plans to adapt them into films, though.

Considering what a cash cow "Bourne" has become, they would be foolish not to.

Franz Ferdinand
Adjunct
Posts: 1259
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 3:22 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Contact:

Postby Franz Ferdinand » Mon Aug 06, 2007 4:39 pm

Thank goodness for Jason Bourne. After a summer of terribly underwhelming second sequels, his is the first to better its previous ones in nearly every worthwhile aspect. Spidey 3, Shrek the Turd, Pirates: At Patience's End, Ocean's Thirteen, the upcoming Rush Hour 3 - all of them far below the quality and box office performance of the previous installment in the franchise.
It might be this pervading sense of lowering quality standards that makes the Bourne Ultimatum shine that much brighter. I have never had many problems with Greengrass (considering I have only seen the previous Bourne and have that as his sole example of directing in my mind), though if I were to pick between the slick Transformers and the jittery Ultimatum, I would pick his handheld cameras any day. The fight sequences are tremendous, though my favorite moment was Bourne breaking into Vosen's office, a revelation that had the audience "ohh"ing and roaring in laughter. Matt Damon throws his all into his character, he needs an Oscar nod for it!

User avatar
MovieWes
Professor
Posts: 2019
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 12:33 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas, USA
Contact:

Postby MovieWes » Sat Aug 04, 2007 12:09 pm

criddic3 wrote:Is this really the "third and final" film of the franchise?

Aren't there more books than that? Couldn't they make more movies? Did Matt Damon say that he wasn't going to do any more?

There are only three Jason Bourne books by Robert Ludlum. However, Eric Van Lusterbader, with permission by Ludlum's estate, has written two more Bourne novels, "The Bourne Legacy" and "The Bourne Betrayal". I'm not sure if Universal has any plans to adapt them into films, though.
"Young men make wars and the virtues of war are the virtues of young men: courage and hope for the future. Then old men make the peace, and the vices of peace are the vices of old men: mistrust and caution." -- Alec Guinness (Lawrence of Arabia)

User avatar
OscarGuy
Site Admin
Posts: 12379
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 12:22 am
Location: Springfield, MO
Contact:

Postby OscarGuy » Sat Aug 04, 2007 10:29 am

I won't call Greengrass a bad director, because I did enjoy United 93 as a cinematic work, but I don't think he's all that and a bucket of chicken.
Wesley Lovell

"Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both." - Benjamin Franklin


Return to “2000 - 2007”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest