1976 Oscar Shouldabeens

1927/28 through 1997
CalWilliam
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Re: 1976 Oscar Shouldabeens

Postby CalWilliam » Sat Aug 08, 2015 8:49 am

BEST PICTURE: L'argent de poche (Small Change)
BEST DIRECTING: Alan J. Pakula, All the President's Men
BEST LEADING ACTOR: Robert De Niro, Taxi Driver
BEST LEADING ACTRESS: Faye Dunaway, Network
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR: Jason Robards, All the President's Men
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS: Isabelle Adjani, Le locataire
BEST SCREENPLAY: Le locataire
BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY: Bound for Glory
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Re: 1976 Oscar Shouldabeens

Postby Kellens101 » Thu Feb 19, 2015 5:53 pm

Best Picture: Taxi Driver
Best Director: Martin Scorsese for Taxi Driver
Best Actor: Robert DeNiro in Taxi Driver
Best Actress: Liv Ullmann in Face to Face
Best Supporting Actor: Peter Finch in Network
Best Supporting Actress: Beatrice Straight in Network
Best Original Screenplay: Network
Best Adapted Screenplay: All the President's Men
Best Score: Taxi Driver
Best Art Direction: Logan's Run
Best Costume Design: Fellini's Casanova
Best Editing: Taxi Driver
Best Cinematography: Bound for Glory
Best Sound: King Kong
Best Foreign Film: Solaris
Last edited by Kellens101 on Sat Jul 23, 2016 2:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: 1976 Oscar Shouldabeens

Postby mojoe92 » Tue Jul 30, 2013 4:44 am

Best Picture

Rocky- WINNER
Cousin, cousine- RUNNER UP
All the President's Men- 3rd Place
Taxi Driver- 5th Place
1900- 4th Place

Best Director

Michael Ritchie- The Bad News Bears- 4th Place
Charles B. Pierce- The Town that Dreaded Sundown- RUNNER UP
Alan J Pakula- All the President's Men- WINNER
Martin Scorsese- Taxi Driver- 3rd Place
Henry Jaglom- Tracks- 5th Place

Best Actress

Sissy Spacek- Carrie- 4th Place
Marie Christine-Barrult- Cousin, cousine- WINNER
Liv Ullman- Face to Face- 5th Place
Karen Black- Burnt Offerings- 3rd Place
Barbara Harris- Freaky Friday- RUNNER UP

Best Actor

Sylvester Stallone- Rocky- 3rd Place
Peter Finch- Network- WINNER
Robert De Niro- 1900- RUNNER UP
Donald Sutherland- The Eagle Has Landed- 5th Place
Robert Redford- All The President's Men- 4th Place

Best Supporting Actress

Jane Alexander- All The President's Men- 3rd Place
Piper Laurie- Carrie- WINNER
Jodie Foster- Taxi Driver- RUNNER UP
Mariel Hemingway- Lipstick- 5th Place
Katherine Ross- Voyage of the Damned- 4th Place

Best Supporting Actor

Burt Young- Rocky- WINNER
Burgess Meredith- Rocky- 5th Place
Ned Beatty- Network- RUNNER UP
Jason Robards- All The President's Men- 4th Place
Hal Holbrook- All The President's Men- 3rd Place

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Re: 1976 Oscar Shouldabeens

Postby ksrymy » Sun Jul 28, 2013 3:27 pm

BEST PICTURE
01. Network (dir. Sidney Lumet)
02. All the President’s Men (dir. Alan J. Pakula)
03. Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (dir. Chantal Akerman)
04. Harlan County, U. S. A. (dir. Barbara Kopple)
05. Taxi Driver (dir. Martin Scorsese)
06. Carrie (dir. Brian De Palma)
07. 1900 (dir. Bernando Bertolucci)
08. Bound for Glory (dir. Hal Ashby)
09. The Tenant (dir. Roman Polanski)
10. God Told Me To (dir. Larry Cohen)

BEST DIRECTOR
01. Chantal Akerman; Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles
02. Sidney Lumet, Network
03. Alan J. Pakula, All the President’s Men
04. Barbara Kopple; Harlan County, U. S. A.
05. Martin Scorsese, Taxi Driver

BEST ACTOR
01. William Holden, Network
02. Alain Delon, Mr. Klein
03. Robert De Niro, Taxi Driver
04. Gérard Depardieu, 1900
05. Woody Allen, The Front

BEST ACTRESS
01. Delphine Seyrig; Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles
02. Sissy Spacek, Carrie
03. Liv Ullmann, Face to Face
04. Faye Dunaway, Network
05. Hilda Koronel, Insiang

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
01. Laurence Olivier, Marathon Man
02. Peter Finch, Network
03. Zero Mostel, The Front
04. Alan Arkin, The Seven-Per-Cent Solution
05. Jason Robards, All the President’s Men

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
01. Piper Laurie, Carrie
02. Laura Betti, 1900
03. Mona Lisa, Insiang
04. Geraldine Chaplin, Cría cuervos
05. Beatrice Straight, Network

BEST SCREENPLAY
01. Network (Paddy Chayefsky)
02. All the President's Men (William Goldman, based on the book by Carl Bernstein & Bob Woodward)
03. Mr. Klein (Franco Solinas, Fernando Morandi)
04. Taxi Driver (Paul Schrader)
05. The Front (Walter Bernstein)

BEST FILM EDITING
01. Harlan County, U. S. A. (Nancy Baker, Mirra Bank, Lora Hays, Mary Lampson)
02. Assault on Precinct 13 (John Carpenter)
03. Carrie (Paul Hirsch)
04. Taxi Driver (Tom Rolf, Melvin Shapiro)
05. All the President's Men (Robert L. Wolfe)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
01. Bound for Glory (Haskell Wexler)
02. 1900 (Vittorio Storaro)
03. The Tenant (Sven Nykvist)
04. The Man Who Fell to Earth (Anthony B. Richmond)
05. Obsession (Vilmos Zsigmond)

BEST ART DIRECTION
01. The Innocent (Mario Garbuglia, Carlo Gervasi)
02. 1900 (Maria Paola Maino, Gianni Quaranta, Ezio Frigerio)
03. Fellini's Casanova (Danilo Donati)
04. Logan's Run (Dale Hennesy, Robert De Vestel)
05. Mr. Klein (Alexandre Trauner, Pierre Charron, Gérard James)

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
01. Fellini's Casanova (Danilo Donati, Federico Fellini)
02. The Innocent (Piero Tosi)
03. Bugsy Malone (Monica Howe)
04. 1900 (Gitt Magrini)
05. The Seven-Per-Cent Solution (Alan Barrett)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
01. Taxi Driver (Bernard Herrmann)
02. The Omen (Jerry Goldsmith)
03. Assault on Precinct 13 (John Carpenter)
04. Obsession (Bernard Herrmann)
05. Rocky (Bill Conti)

BEST ORIGINAL SONG
01. The Omen ("Ave Satani," music and lyrics by Jerry Goldsmith)
02. Car Wash ("Car Wash," music and lyrics by Norman Whitfield, performed by Rose Royce)
03. Sparkle ("Something He Can Feel," music and lyrics by Curtis Mayfield, performed by Lonette McKee, Irene Cara, and Dwan Smith)
04. Rocky ("Gonna Fly Now," music by Bill Conti, lyrics by Carol Connors and Ayn Robbins, performed by Deetta West and Nelson Pigford)
05. The Pink Panther Strikes Again ("Come to Me," music by Henry Mancini, lyrics by Don Black, performed by Tom Jones)

BEST SOUND
01. Assault on Precinct 13 (William Cooper, Bill Varney, Tommy Lee Wallace)
02. All the President's Men (Milton C. Burrow, Les Fresholtz, Arthur Piantadosi, James E. Webb)
03. Marathon Man (David M. Ronne, Edward L. Sandlin, Fred Stafford, John Wilkinson)
04. Carrie (Lois Freeman, Bert Hallberg, Dan Sable, Dick Vorisek)
05. The Man Who Fell to Earth (Desmond Briscoe, Robin Gregory, Bob Jones, Colin Miller)

BEST MAKEUP & HAIRSTYLING
01. Carrie (Wes Dawn, Adele Taylor, Ron Snyder)
02. Murder by Death (Joe DiBella, Charles H. Schram, Vivienne Walker)
03. The Tenant (Didier Lavergne, Ludovic Paris)
04. 1900 (Paolo Borselli, Iole Cecchini, Giannetto De Rossi, Fabrizio Sforza, Maurizio Trani)
05. Fellini's Casanova (Gabriella Borzelli, Rino Carboni, Giannetto De Rossi, Fabrizio Sforza)

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
01. Logan's Run (Glen Robinson, L. B. Abbott, Terry W. King, Wayne Rose)
02. King Kong (Rick Baker, Joe Day, Glen Robinson, Terry W. King, Wayne Rose, Barry Nolan)
03. Carrie (Greg Auer, Ken Pepiot)
04. The Omen (John Richardson, George Gibbs, Roy Field)
05. Fellini's Casanova (Adriano Pischiutta)

FINAL TALLY
7 nominations: Carrie (2 wins), Network (3 wins), 1900
6 nominations: All the President's Men, Taxi Driver (1 win)
4 nominations: Fellini's Casanova (1 win)
3 nominations: Assault on Precinct 13 (1 win), The Front; Harlan County, U. S. A. (1 win); Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (2 wins); Mr. Klein, The Omen (1 win), The Tenant
2 nominations: Bound for Glory (1 win), The Innocent (1 win), Insiang, Logan's Run (1 win), The Man Who Fell to Earth, Marathon Man (1 win), Obsession, Rocky, The Seven-Per-Cent Solution
1 nomination: Bugsy Malone, Car Wash, Cría cuervos, Face to Face, God Told Me To, King Kong, Murder by Death, The Pink Panther Strikes Again, Sparkle
Last edited by ksrymy on Sun Oct 29, 2017 4:34 pm, edited 44 times in total.
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Postby flipp525 » Tue Sep 29, 2009 3:55 pm

Mister Tee wrote:Kathleen Quinlan in I Never Promised You a Rose Garden were way superior to anything Marsha Mason has ever done, as well as the two good actresses in the turgid Turning Point.

Really, Tee? I thought Quinlan was laughably awful in I Never Promised You a Rose Garden. It was like she took Crazy 101 in a local community college theater class and then decided to deliver her performance with the hopes of a laugh track being added one day. A Razzie-worthy performance if they'd been handed out back then.

Susan Tyrrell, Signe Hasso and Sylvia Sidney all made her look like a complete amateur.
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Postby Mister Tee » Sun May 17, 2009 1:14 pm

Well, I'll be the one to defend the critical consensus of the time and push for Liv Ullmann. Ullmann's string of Swedish-language performances -- Cries and Whispers, the two parts of The Emigrants/New Land, Scenes from a Marriage, finally Face to Face -- put her head and shoulders above anything any actress was doing in American films during the period. (Very much including Ullmann herself, as 40 Carats and Lost Horizon need to be buried, not merely forgotten) Many of us thought Face to Face was her zenith in this period, and even old Hollywood hand Sidney Skolsky predicted she'd take home the Oscar that night. Dunaway's acceptable-on-its-own-terms win was a great disappointment to me.

Barrault was nominated because she had the lead in an art-house hit, and because there weren't many notable candidates for best actress that year. But it's not as if that was an unusual occurrence in that decade. Totally unknown Glenda Jackson had won in '70 because the competition was hopelessly lean. Jane Fonda was practically a unanimous choice in '71 (former winners Christie and Jackson were also worthy, but Suzman and Redgrave? Please) The '72 slate was unusually strong, but in '73 things were so weak Tatum O'Neal was widely considered to have given the top female performance of the bunch. '74 was also solid, but then '75 is in the running for weakest of all time. In that context, dominant central performances by Ullmann, Spacek and Dunaway made for an above-average year, not a notably bad one. (Shire was pretty good, as well, but unmistakably supporting -- the pinnacle of the era's trend of putting potential supporting winners, like Perrine and Fletcher, into lead)

I agree '77 was a good year for lead actresses, but not because of the nominees. Only Fonda and Keaton deserved their nods; Shelley Duvall in 3 Women, Tomlin in The Late Show and Kathleen Quinlan in I Never Promised You a Rose Garden were way superior to anything Marsha Mason has ever done, as well as the two good actresses in the turgid Turning Point.

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Postby Big Magilla » Sun May 17, 2009 12:37 pm

I think you mean Barrbara Harris, not Barrie, in Family Plot.

I agree it was a dismal year for lead actresses. Maybe not as bad the year before, but certainly not good. The next two years would have more than enough good performances in the category to make up for it.

I haven't seen Face to Face in more than thirty years and really don't remember Ullmann's performance all that much it so I took Liv Ullmann off my personal list a while ago.

I've never seen A Matter of Time.

Barrault smiles nicely in Cousin, Cousine and is certainly a better choice than Streisand, Hawn, Hawn, Harris and Maggie Smith whose screen time in Murder by Death is limited. I've never seen Jackson's The Incredible Sarah.

For me the solid choices are Spacek, Dunaway and Shire, though the latter could really be nominated in either category. Hepburn and Miles get my fourth and fifth slots, though if I ever get to see Face to Face again I might bring Ullmann back in Miles' place but Spacek is in no danger of losing my personal award.




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Postby Cinemanolis » Sun May 17, 2009 9:03 am

I just watched 'Cousin, Cousine' and wondered how the hell did Marie Christine Barrault managed to score a Best Actress nod for it. I mean she was good but nothing note-worthy.

And then i saw what her competition was. What a crapy year for the Best Actress category! I am really struggling to compile my top5 of the year. Besides Liv Ullmann, Sissy Spacek and Faye Dunaway there is chaos. Sarah Miles was also good, but she wouldn't make in my top 5 in any other year. But finding the 5th nominee in this category is a real challenge.

Talia Shire - Rocky
Barbara Streisand - A Star Is Born
Goldie Hawn - The Duchess and the Dirtwater Fox
Barbara Barrie - Family Plot
Maggie Smith - Murder by Death
Glenda Jackson - The Incredible Sarah
Marie Christine Barrault - Cousin, Cousine
Audrey Hepburn - Robin and Marion

Not an impressive line-up. Barrault and Hepburn do seem the best choices for the 5th spot, but then i remembered a beloved actress in a lousy film. Ingrid Bergman in 'A Matter of Time'. What a mess of a film this was, but still Bergman is good and gets the 5th spot in my personal ballot.




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Postby Hustler » Thu Feb 01, 2007 9:13 am

Art Carney delivered an exquisite performance that year.

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Postby flipp525 » Thu Feb 01, 2007 8:42 am

--Damien wrote:And I'm sick of the denigration of Art Carney's award -- that was one of the Academy's best and most incisive choices ever,

I completely agree. Also, I thought Geraldine Fitzgerald's performance in Harry and Tonto could've been recognized that year with a nomination in support. I have a lot of leftover love for her supporting performance in Dark Victory. A lovely turn.




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Postby dylanfan23 » Thu Feb 01, 2007 12:19 am

--Damien wrote:Wow, not only is Lumet among the most inept of directors, he's a pompous ass, as well -- almost as pompous as Paddy Chayefsky.

I've said it before and I'll say it again: Bound For Glory is by far the best of 1976's Best Picture nominees, and Alan J. Pakula, Scorsese and, of course, Lumet (not to mention John G. Avildsen) were not even fit to be Hal Ashby's P.A.

And I'm sick of the denigration of Art Carney's award -- that was one of the Academy's best and most incisive choices ever,

I can't believe lumet said that, thats really unfortunate that those thoughts enter someones head. Even though i did think the verdict was best picture of 1982.....i guess...well at least out of the nominees. Well yea i did really like the verdict and thought newman deserved it as well.

But i'm really commenting on bound for glory...i'm glad to see others appreciate that film...it hit me on a very personal level because of my love for guthrie's music for as long as i can remember. And seeing that film and how well that story was told really brought tears to my eyes and i'm being completely serious on that. And in a year that many films were great in my opinion, that one often gets forgotten unfortunatly.

Now saying that much, i am also probably the biggest lover of the first rocky on this board. It's also a film that hit me on an emotional level and i found myself loving each character and i thought it was such a well told character piece. So i would have in fact given that award to rocky and given the director award to ashby who deserved 4 or 5 best director nominations! not 1!




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Postby Damien » Thu Jan 18, 2007 8:11 pm

--Big Magilla wrote:I will go to my grave insisting that How Green Was My Valley was and is a better film overall than Citizen Kane.

I wouldn't quite agree with that, but Mason and I always startled interviewers any time we said that we both felt How Green Was My Valley is the best movie ever to win Best Picture (adding that it just wasn't the best picture of 1941).




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Postby Big Magilla » Thu Jan 18, 2007 1:18 pm

--Eric wrote:But for many, the 49th Academy Awards remains exhibit A in any argument about the academy's less than perfect taste -- a critique that usually cites the best-picture loss of "Citizen Kane" in 1942 (to John Ford's "How Green Was My Valley"), Alfred Hitchcock's lack of a best-director award or Art Carney's best-actor win in 1975 over Nicholson ("Chinatown"), Al Pacino ("The Godfather: Part II") and Dustin Hoffman ("Lenny").

A know-nothing writer.

Yes, Rocky was a poor choice to beat All the President's Men, Taxi Driver, Network and "the fifth nominee", Bound for Glory, but Oscar has a long history of rewarding the wrong films, directors and performances. Those he cities, howver, are ludicrous.

I will go to my grave insisting that How Green Was My Valley was and is a better film overall than Citizen Kane.

While I preferred Nicholson and Pacino to Carney in 1974, Carney's victory was a delightful surprise and an example of good, not bad, taste. Hitchcock's lack of a win is disheartening, but then so is his lack of recognition from other groups. The one film he won a New York Film Critics Award for, 1938's The Lady Vanishes, might have won him an Oscar were it not for the vagueries of the Oscar eligibility rules. It wasn't eligible until the following year.

Oh, and that Lumet quote is old news.




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Postby Eric » Thu Jan 18, 2007 12:21 pm

Haha... yeah, the only reason I posted that when I saw it on the wires this morning was because I knew you'd have words for putting "Bound for Glory" in a paranthetical.

Plus I admired the idiocy of saying "auteur" was coined "recently" in 1976.

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Postby Damien » Thu Jan 18, 2007 12:01 pm

Eric wrote:Sidney Lumet directed "Network," the darkly satirical portrait of TV news. It won three acting Oscars and best screenplay for Paddy Chayefsky, but the best-picture loss still stings for Lumet.

"I've been nominated five times," the director told The Associated Press last year. "But on two occasions, I got so pissed off about what beat us. With `Network,' we were beaten out by `Rocky' for Christ's sake." (Lumet, who was finally awarded an honorary Oscar in 2005, also mentions the best picture win for "Gandhi" over his "The Verdict" in 1983.)


Wow, not only is Lumet among the most inept of directors, he's a pompous ass, as well -- almost as pompous as Paddy Chayefsky.

I've said it before and I'll say it again: Bound For Glory is by far the best of 1976's Best Picture nominees, and Alan J. Pakula, Scorsese and, of course, Lumet (not to mention John G. Avildsen) were not even fit to be Hal Ashby's P.A.

And I'm sick of the denigration of Art Carney's award -- that was one of the Academy's best and most incisive choices ever,
"Y'know, that's one of the things I like about Mitt Romney. He's been consistent since he changed his mind." -- Christine O'Donnell


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