1945 Oscar Shouldabeens

1927/28 through 1997
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Re: 1945 Oscar Shouldabeens

Postby Kellens101 » Sat Jun 13, 2015 10:54 am

Best Picture: The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
Best Director: Michael Powell for The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
Best Actor: Ray Milland in The Lost Weekend
Best Actress: Joan Crawford in Mildred Pierce
Best Supporting Actor: James Dunn in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
Best Supporting Actress: Peggy Ann Garner in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
Best Original Screenplay: The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
Best Adapted Screenplay: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
Best Score: Spellbound
Best Art Direction: The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
Best Costume Design: The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
Best Cinematography: The Lost Weekend
Best Editing: The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
Best Sound: The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

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Re: 1945 Oscar Shouldabeens

Postby Cinemanolis » Mon Oct 07, 2013 6:09 pm

PICTURE
I Know Where I’m Going
The Lost Weekend
*A Tree Grows In Brooklyn
And Then There Were None
To Have and Have Not
The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

DIRECTOR
Alfred Hitchcock - Spellbound
*Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger - Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
Billy Wilder - The Lost Weekend
Elia Kazan - A Tree Grows In Brooklyn
Howard Hawkes - To Have and Have Not

ACTOR
*Ray Milland - The Lost Weekend
Edward G. Robinson - Scarlet Street
Robert Walker – The Clock
Gregory Peck - The Keys of the Kingdom
Robert Livesey – The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

ACTRESS
Ingrid Bergman - The Bells of St. Mary
Joan Crawford - Mildred Pierce
*Wendy Hiller - I Know Where I’m Going
Bette Davis – The Corn Is Green
Dorothy McGuire - A Tree Grows In Brooklyn

SUPPORTING ACTOR
Henry Travers – The Bells of St. Mary
Anton Walbrook - The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
James Dunn - A Tree Grows In Brooklyn
Robert Mitchum – The Story of G.I. Joe
Walter Brennan - To Have and Have Not
John Dall – The Corn Is Green

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
*Peggy Ann Garner - A Tree Grows In Brooklyn
Anne Revere - National Velvet
Pamela Brown - I Know Where I’m Going
Angela Lansbury - The Picture of Dorian Gray
Lauren Bacall - To Have and Have Not

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
The Bells of St. Mary
I Know Where I’m Going
*The Lost Weekend
The Clock
The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Spellbound
The Picture of Dorian Gray
*A Tree Grows In Brooklyn
And Then There Were None
To Have and Have Not
Scarlet Street

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Re: 1945 Oscar Shouldabeens

Postby ksrymy » Wed Jul 31, 2013 3:14 pm

BEST PICTURE
01. Children of Paradise (dir. Marcel Carné)
02. Rome, Open City (dir. Roberto Rossellini)
03. Brief Encounter (dir. David Lean)
04. Detour (dir. Edgar G. Ulmer)
05. The Body Snatcher (dir. Robert Wise)
06. Leave Her to Heaven (dir. John M. Stahl)
07. Scarlet Street (dir. Fritz Lang)
08. The Lost Weekend (dir. Billy Wilder)
09. I Know Where I'm Going! (dir. Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger)
10. Blithe Spirit (dir. David Lean)

BEST DIRECTOR
01. Marcel Carné, Children of Paradise
02. Roberto Rossellini; Rome, Open City
03. David Lean, Brief Encounter
04. Edgar G. Ulmer, Detour
05. Fritz Lang, Scarlet Street

BEST ACTOR
01. Jean-Louis Barrault, Children of Paradise
02. John Garfield, Pride of the Marines
03. Laird Cregar, Hangover Square
04. Edward G. Robinson, Scarlet Street
05. Ray Milland, The Lost Weekend

BEST ACTRESS
01. Celia Johnson, Brief Encounter
02. Gene Tierney, Leave Her to Heaven
03. Arletty, Children of Paradise
04. Wendy Hiller, I Know Where I'm Going!
05. Maria Casarès, Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
01. Boris Karloff, The Body Snatcher
02. Michael Redgrave, Dead of Night
03. Herbert Rudley, A Walk in the Sun
04. S. Z. Sakall, Christmas in Connecticut
05. Pierre Brasseur, Children of Paradise

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
01. Anna Magnani; Rome, Open City
02. Margaret Rutherford, Blithe Spirit
03. Ann Savage, Detour
04. Signe Hasso, Johnny Angel
05. Maria Casarès, Children of Paradise

BEST SCREENPLAY
01. Children of Paradise (Jacques Prévert)
02. Brief Encounter (Noël Coward, Anthony Havelock-Allan, David Lean, Ronald Neame, based on the play "Still Life" by Noël Coward)
03. Scarlet Street (Dudley Nichols, based on the novel and play "La Chienne" by Georges de La Fouchardière and André Mouëzy-Éon)
04. Rome, Open City (Sergio Amidei, Federico Fellini, Alberto Consiglio, Roberto Rossellini)
05. I Know Where I'm Going! (Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger)

BEST FILM EDITING
01. Rome, Open City (Eraldo Da Roma, Jolanda Benvenuti)
02. A Study in Choreography for Camera (Maya Deren)
03. Objective, Burma! (George Amy)
04. Children of Paradise (Henri Rust, Madeleine Bonin)
05. Brief Encounter (Jack Harris)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
01. Children of Paradise (Roger Hubert)
02. Leave Her to Heaven (Leon Shamroy)
03. I Know Where I'm Going! (Erwin Hillier)
04. Objective, Burma! (James Wong Howe)
05. Mildred Pierce (Ernest Haller)

BEST ART DIRECTION
01. Children of Paradise (Léon Barsacq, Raymond Gabutti)
02. Yolanda and the Thief (Cedric Gibbons, Jack Martin Smith)
03. Kitty (Hans Dreier, Sam Comer, Ray Moyer)
04. The Picture of Dorian Gray (Cedric Gibbons, Hans Peters)
05. The Valley of Decision (Cedric Gibbons, Paul Groesse)

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
01. Children of Paradise (Mayo)
02. The Spanish Main (Edward Stevenson)
03. Yolanda and the Thief (Irene Sharaff)
04. Kitty (Raoul Pene Du Bois)
05. A Royal Scandal (René Hubert)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
01. Children of Paradise (Maurice Thiriet)
02. Hangover Square (Bernard Herrmann)
03. The Spanish Main (Hanns Eisler)
04. Spellbound (Miklós Rózsa)
05. State Fair (original score by Cyril J. Mockridge, Alfred Newman, Edward B. Powell, Gene Rose, original songs by Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II)

BEST ORIGINAL SONG
01. State Fair ("It Might as Well Be Spring," music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, performed by Louanne Hogan dubbing Jeanne Crain)
02. San Antonio ("Some Sunday Morning," music by M. K. Jerome, Ray Heindorf, lyrics by Ted Koehler, performed by Bobbie Canvin dubbing Alexis Smith)
03. Love Letters ("Love Letters," music by Victor Young)
04. Anchors Aweigh ("I Fall in Love Too Easily," music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Sammy Kahn, performed by Frank Sinatra)
05. Tonight and Every Night ("Cry and You Cry Alone," music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Sammy Kahn, perfomed by Martha Mears dubbing Rita Hayworth)

BEST SOUND
01. Objective, Burma! (C. A. Riggs)
02. They Were Expendable (Douglas Shearer)
03. Wonder Man (Fred Lau)
04. A Walk in the Sun (Corson Jowett)
05. A Song to Remember (Lodge Cunningham)

BEST MAKEUP & HAIRSTYLING
01. Children of Paradise (uncredited)
02. Kitty (Wally Westmore)
03. Blithe Spirit (Tony Sforzini, Vivienne Walker)
04. Caesar and Cleopatra (George Blackler)
05. Yolanda and the Thief (Jack Dawn)

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
01. Blithe Spirit (Tom Howard, Charles Staffell)
02. Wonder Man (John P. Fulton; Harry Redmond, Jr.)
03. The Spanish Main (Vernon L. Walker)
04. They Were Expendable (A. Arnold Gillespie, Mark Davis, Donald Jahraus, Warren Newcombe)
05. Objective, Burma! (Paul Detlefsen, Edwin B. DuPar)

FINAL TALLY
13 nominations: Children of Paradise (9 wins)
5 nominations: Brief Encounter (1 win); Rome, Open City (2 wins)
4 nominations: Blithe Spirit (1 win), I Know Where I'm Going!; Objective, Burma! (1 win), Scarlet Street
3 nominations: Detour, Kitty, Leave Her to Heaven, The Spanish Main, Yolanda and the Thief
2 nominations: The Body Snatcher (1 win), Hangover Square, The Lost Weekend, State Fair (1 win), They Were Expendable, A Walk in the Sun, Wonder Man
1 nomination: Anchors Aweigh, Caesar and Cleopatra, Christmas in Connecticut, Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne, Dead of Night, Johnny Angel, Love Letters, Mildred Pierce, Pride of the Marines, A Royal Scandal, San Antonio, A Song to Remember, Spellbound, A Study in Choreography for Camera, Tonight and Every Night, The Valley of Decision
Last edited by ksrymy on Sat Oct 03, 2015 2:55 am, edited 80 times in total.
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Postby Reza » Thu Jul 14, 2005 9:58 am

Yes Florence Bates is very amusing - yet sympathetic. Flora Robson has one brilliant bit (just a few seconds of screen time) where she reacts to Bergman's angry slap by catching hold of her hand and kissing it gently. Although that black face make-up is simply too much.



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Postby Big Magilla » Thu Jul 14, 2005 8:41 am

Flora Robson wasn't yet a dame when she was nominated, but she was a highly respected stage and screen actress whose performances in Catherine the Great, Fire Over England, We Are Not Alone, Wuthering Heights and The Sea Hawk all wet for naught when it came to the Oscars. She was simply overdue and her performance, along with Florence Bates', though way over the top, was far more entertaining than that of celebrated leads Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman, both of whom were badly miscast.

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Postby Reza » Wed Jul 13, 2005 10:26 pm

Can someone please explain Dame Flora Robson's nod for Saratoga Trunk?

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Postby Big Magilla » Mon Jun 06, 2005 10:59 pm

I never went to Catholic school but I did take religious instruction from the nuns twice a week until I was at least 12. My favorite nun, who was promoted to Mother Superior the last after I had her, reminded me very much of the nun Bergman played in The Bells of St. Mary's. She was funny, too.

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Postby Damien » Mon Jun 06, 2005 7:07 pm

Leo McCarey's greatness as a director is his ability to show human beings as the idiosyncratic beings they are and at the same time convey a great affection for them despite (or perhaps because of) their foibles. This attitude and skill made McCarey – along with Jean Renoir – the screen's foremost humanist.

Above all, The Bells Of St. Mary's is a celebration of kindness. Its series of vignettes consist of people reaching out to other people, and what makes it so effective and – to me – moving is that McCarey doesn't shy away from showing the people in the film to be somewhat foolish – and they are all the more endearing for it, and true to life.

Such moments as Ingrid Bergman teaching Dickie Tyler how to box, Bing Crosby removing the rat from Joan Carroll's hair, Bing declaring that his first day at the parish is a school holiday, Ingrid's reaction to Joan's declaration that she wants to be a nun ("You want to be a nun because you've FOUND something"), the great Henry Travers's moment of revelation (and Ingrid's reaction to it), the reunion of Joan and William Gargan ("Are you really my Daddy?"), a throwaway line about one of the students ("Luther? How'd he get in here?"), Joan's essay about the five senses ("To put it in my own words, 'To Be or Not To Be . . . ") and Ingrid's reaction when she reads it in class, the final scene when Bing tells Ingrid the truth about her health – and the hesitancy he shows as he decides whether or not to divulge is a great acting moment -- and, of course, the Christmas pageant – all these continue to thrill and delight me each time I see the movie, and I must have seen it about 20 times over the years.

One thing that sets the film above Going My Way is that Bing and Ingrid are equals in a way that Bing and Barry FitzGerald weren't in the earlier film – Fitzgerald was essentially just an ineffectual cute old character. There's a tension underlying Bells of St. Mary's because if it wasn't for the clerical collar and the nun's habit, this would be a love story.

It's a film that – as corny as it sounds – makes me happy to be alive and part of the human race. Johnny Guitar once said that marriage never seemed as sexy as it does in McCarey's The Awful Truth. Similarly, I would also say that a religious vocation never seemed as admirable or rewarding as it does in The Bells of St. Mary's.

I'm willing to concede that if like I and (I believe) Magilla you had nuns in grammar school, you might relate to the picture more than other people, but the movie is so rich with joy and compassion and uplifting humor that I would think that even an atheist would love it. For 40 years now, it has seemed to me to be an utterly captivating movie.
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Postby Reza » Mon Jun 06, 2005 10:45 am

I suppose you have ''a point or two'' in favor of the film. Let's just say that, apart from Bergman, I wasn't too ecstatic about the film. Damien even includes Martha Sleeper amongst his nods for supporting actress.

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Postby Big Magilla » Sun Jun 05, 2005 7:56 pm

It's a rare case of the sequel transcending the original. As you say, Bergman is luminous throughout and the main reason for seeing the film over and over, a Christmas time perennial that found renewed interest when it was featured on the Radio City Music Hall marquee in a key scene in The Godfather.

The early scene with the cat recalls McCarey's direction of Cary Grant and Asta in The Awful Truth and the ending is sublime. In-between, Bing's singing and the acting, particularly of Bergman, Henry Travers, Ruth Donnelly and the always delightful Una O'Connor take it past its few dull spots.

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Postby Reza » Sun Jun 05, 2005 3:31 am

Damien and Magilla,

The Bells of St Mary's seems to have really struck a chord with both of you. I saw this on tv in the 1970s for the first time and could barely recall it. I watched it again last night after all those years. However, I still don't get the appeal this film has for you both and so many others. The leads are good, ofcourse, but Bing is no different to most of the stuff he did before (especially Going My Way the year before). Bergman is luminous throughout and there is a fine supporting cast but the film is no different to so many films that came out during that era.

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Postby Precious Doll » Sun Mar 27, 2005 2:59 am

Best Film

Body Snatcher, The
**Leave Her to Heaven
Lost Weekend, The
Picture of Dorian Gray, The
Valley of Decision, The

Best Director

Tay Garnett for The Valley of Decision
Albert Lewin for The Picture of Dorian Gray
**John M Stahl for Leave Her to Heaven
Billy Wilder for The Lost Weekend
Robert Wise for The Body Snatcher

Best Actor

Bing Crosby for The Bellys of St Marys
Henry Dainell for The Body Snatcher
**Ray Milland for The Lost Weekend
Gregory Peck for The Valley of Decision
Robert Young for The Enchanted Cottage

Best Actress

Ingrid Bergman for The Bells of St Marys
Joan Crawford for Mildred Pierce
Greer Garson for The Valley of Decision
Dorothy McGuire for The Enchanted Cottage
**Gene Tierney for Leave Her to Heaven

Best Supporting Actor

Dan Duryea for Scarlett Street
Boris Karloff for The Body Snatcher
Herbert Marshall for The Enchanted Cottage
Robert Mitcum for G I Joe
**George Sanders for The Picture of Dorian Gray

Best Supporting Actress

Eve Arden for Mildred Pierce
Ann Blyth for Mildred Pierce
Rosalind Ivan for Scarlett Street
Angela Lansbury for The Picture of Dorian Gray
**Margaret Rutherford for Blith Spirit
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Postby Big Magilla » Thu Dec 30, 2004 5:41 pm

I'm partial to 1940 myself, but 1945 was a good year as well.

What makes up our ten best lists depends on whether we're talking about films released in New York, Los Angeles, anywhere in the U.S. or anywhere in the world. Leo McCarey's The Bells of St. Mary's, Billy Wilder's The Lost Weekend, Elia Kazan's A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Michael Curtiz's Mildred Pierce, Fritz Lang's Scarlet Street, Albert Lewin's The Picture of Dorian Gray and Jean Renoir's The Southerner would qualify in any case. Clarence Brown's National Velvet and John M. Stahl's The Keys of the Kingdom would qualify only if we're basing our lists on L.A. openings. Blithe Spirt would quaify for all except L.A. opening dates. Roberto Rossellini's Open City, Marcel Carne's Children of Paradise, David Lean's Brief Encounter and the multi-directed Dead of Night were 1946 releases in the U.S., Powell & Pressburger's I Know Where I'm Going! didn't play U.S. theatres until 1947. Alexander Korda's Vacation from Marriage and Powell & Pressburger's The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp were 1943 releases in the U.K., but 1945 releases in the U.S.

The year's best actors based on Los Angeles openings would have to include Ray Milland in The Lost Weekend, still the screen's best portrayal of an alcoholic, Gregory Peck in The Keys of the Kingdom, still the screen's best portrayal of a dedicated priest, Hurd Harfield in The Picture of Dorian Gray (uncannily the man barely aged in real life for many years thereafter), Edward G. Robinson, the best actor never to have received a single Oscar nod, in Scarlet Street, possibly his best performance, and Bing Crosby reprising his Oscar winning role as Father O'Malley in The Bells of St. Mary's. Excluding Peck based on New York opening dates, I would replace him with Roger Livesey in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp. Also worth considering: Charles Laughton in The Suspect, Dick Powell in Murder, My Sweet, Robert Donat in Vacation From Marriage and James Mason in The Sevent Veil.

Supporting actor consideration would have to be given James Dunn in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, George Sanders in The Picture of Dorian Gray, John Dall in The Corn Is Green, Robert Mitchum in The Story of G.I. Joe and Leo G. Carroll in Spellbound. If working on L.A. opening dates only, add Walter Brennan in To Have and Have Not, as well and Donald Crisp in National Velvet. Of note: J. Carrol Naish in A Medal for Benny, Dan Duryea in Scarlet Street and James Gleason in The Clock.

Limiting the ladies to five slots is particularly cruel this year, with Ingrid Bergman's luminous work in The Bells of St. Mary's leading the pack, which includes Joan Crawford in Mildred Pierce, Greer Garson in The Valley of Decision, Gene Tierney in Leave Her to Heaven and Bette Davis in The Corn Is Green, as well as Dorothy McGuire in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Judy Garland in The Clock, Jennifer Jones in Love Letters, Joan Bennett in Scarlet Street and Barbara Stanwck in Christmas in Connecticut.

The list of supporting actresses who excelled this year is no less impressive with Peggy Ann Garner and Joan Blondell in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Beulah Bondi in The Southerner, Angela Lansbury in The Picture of Dorian Gray and Anne Revere in National Velvet (L.A.) or Flora Robson in Saratoga Trunk (N.Y.) leading the pack, followed by Gladys Cooper in The Valley of Decision (and Love Letters), Rosa Stradner in The Keys of the Kingdom (L.A.) or Margaret Rutherford in Blithe Spirit (N.Y.), Geraldine Fitzgerald in (The Strange Affair of) Uncle Harry, Rosalind Ivan in The Suspect and Eve Arden in Mildred Pierce.




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Postby Damien » Tue Dec 14, 2004 3:14 am

I think that it may well be 1945 -- not 1939, nor any year from the over-rated 70s -- that is the best year ever for films. So many great movies, so many memorable performances, so many achievements that may have been number 1 in another year that I had to leave off here (Gene Tierney in Leave Her To Heaven comes to mind) . . .

BEST PICTURE OF 1945
1. The Bells Of St. Mary’s (Leo McCarey)
2. Love Letters (William Dieterle)
3. Fallen Angel (Otto Preminger)
4. Mildred Pierce (Michael Curtiz)
5. They Were Expendable (John Ford)
6. Open City (Roberto Rossellini)
7. The Picture Of Dorian Gray (Albert Lewin)
8. The Lost Weekend (Billy Wilder)
9. The Unseen (Lewis Allen)
10. Yolanda And The Thief (Vincente Minnelli)

BEST ACTOR
1. Ray Milland in The Lost Weekend
2. Bing Crosby in The Bells Of St. Mary’s
3. Jack Carson in Mildred Pierce
4. Hurd Hatfield in The Picture Of Dorian Grey
5. (tie) John Garfield in Pride Of The Marines and Joseph Cotten in Love Letters

BEST ACTRESS
1. Ingrid Bergman in The Bells Of St. Mary’s
2. Joan Crawford in Mildred Pierce
3. Jennifer Jones in Love Letters
4. Dorothy McGuire in The Enchanted Cottage
5. Judy Garland in The Clock

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
1. Henry Travers in The Bells Of St. Mary’s
2. Reginald Owen in Kitty
3. Also Fabrizi in Open City
4. Charles Bickford in Fallen Angel
5. Leo G. Carroll in Spellbound

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
1. Constance Collier in Kitty
2. Martha Sleeper in The Bells Of St. Mary’s
3. Margaret Rutherford in Blithe Spirit
4. Gladys Cooper in Love Letters and The Valley Of Decision
5. Ann Blyth in Mildred Pierce

BEST DIRECTOR
1. Leo McCarey – The Bells Of St. Mary’s
2. William Dieterle – Love Letters
3. Otto Preminger – Fallen Angel
4. Michael Curtiz – Mildred Pierce
5. John Ford – They Were Expendable

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
1. The Bells Of St. Mary’s – Dudley Nichols
2. Children Of Paradise – Jacques Prevert
3. The Clock – Paul Gallico, Puline Gallico; Robert Nathan, Joseph Shrank
4. I Know Where I’m Going! – Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger
5. Yolanda And The Thief – Ludwig Bemelmans, Jacques Théry; Irving Brecher

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
1. Mildred Pierce – Ranald MacDougall
2. Love Letters – Ayn Rand
3. The Lost Weekend – Billy Wilder and Charles Brackett
4. The Picture Of Dorian Gray – Albert Lewin
5. Pride Of The Marines – Albert Maltz

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
1. I Know Where I’m Going! - Erwin Hiller
2. Leave Her To Heaven – Leon Shamroy
3. Mildred Pierce – Ernest Haller
4. Objective, Burma! – James Wong Howe
5. The Picture Of Dorian Gray – Joseph Ruttenberg

BEST FILM EDITING
1. The Bells Of St. Mary’s
2. Love Letters
3. They Were Expendable
4. Mildred Pierce
5. The Lost Weekend

BEST ART DIRECTION
1. Children Of Paradise
2. Kitty
3. Mildred Pierce
4. Leave Her To Heaven
5. The Picture Of Dorian Gray

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
1. Children Of Paradise
2. Kitty
3. The Picture Of Dorian Gray
4. They Were SIsters
5. Imcendiary Blonde

BEST MUSIC – MUSICAL FILM
1. Yolanda and the Thief
2. Billy Rose’s Diamond Horseshoe
3. Tonight and Every Night
4. Incendiary Blonde
5. Duffy’s Tavern

BEST MUSIC – NON-MUSICAL FILM
1. Love Letters – Victor Young
2. Spellbound – Miklos Rozsa
3. Mildred Pierce – Max Steiner
4. The Unseen – Ernst Toch
5. The Valley Of Decision – Herbert Stothart

BEST SONG
1. Love Letters (Love Letters) – Victor Young and Edward Heyman
2. The More I See You (Billy Rose’s Diamond Horseshoe) – Harry Warren and Mack Gordon
3. Like Someone In Love (Belle Of The Yulon) – Jimmy van Heusen and Johnny Burke
4. Accentuate The Positive (Here Come The Waves) – Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer
5. Some Sunday Morning (San Antonio) –Ray Heindorf, M.K. Jerome and Ted Koehler

BEST SPECIAL EFFECTS
1. Back To Bataan
2. They Were Expendable
3. Wonder Man
4. Pride Of The Marines
5. Objective, Burma

BEST MAKE-UP
1. Kitty
2. Children Of Paradise
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Postby MCAR » Tue Dec 14, 2004 1:36 am

Picture:
Colonel Blimp
The Lost Weekend
Mildred Pierce
Scarlet Street
The Southerner

Actor:
Charles Laughton – The Suspect
Roger Livesey – Colonel Blimp
Ray Milland - The Lost Weekend
Edward G. Robinson – Scarlet Street
Anton Walbrook – Colonel Blimp

Actress:
Ingrid Bergman – The Bells Of St. Mary’s
Joan Crawford – Mildred Pierce
Judy Garland – The Clock
Deborah Kerr - Colonel Blimp
Gene Tierney – Leave Her To Heaven

Supporting Actor:
Howard Da Silva – The Lost Weekend
James Dunn – A Tree Grows In Brooklyn
Dan Duryea – Scarlet Street
Michael Redgrave – Dead Of Night
George Sanders – The Picture Of Dorian Gray

Supporting Actress:
Eve Arden – Mildred Pierce
Ann Blyth – Mildred Pierce
Doris Dowling – The Lost Weekend
Agnes Moorehead – Our Vines Have Tender Grapes
Margaret Rutherford – Blithe Spirit

Director:
Michael Curtiz – Mildred Pierce
Fritz Lang – Scarlet Street
Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger – Colonel Blimp
Jean Renoir – The Southerner
Billy Wilder – The Lost Weekend

Original Screenplay:
J. Baines, E.F. Benson, H.G. Wells & A. MacPhail - Dead Of Night
A. Comandini, A. Hamilton & L. Houser - Christmas In Connecticut
R. Flournoy, L. Gorog & T. Monroe - The Affairs Of Susan
P. Gallico, P. Gallico, R, Nathan & J. Schrank - The Clock
Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger – Colonel Blimp

Adapted Screenplay:
Charles Brackett & Billy Wilder - The Lost Weekend
Hugo Butler & Jean Renoir - The Southerner
Albert Lewin - The Picture Of Dorian Gray
Ranald MacDougall - Mildred Pierce
Dudley Nichols - Scarlet Street


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