Visconti & The Leopard

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Postby Hustler » Sun Jul 29, 2007 10:27 am

It seems the contrary.

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Postby ITALIANO » Sun Jul 29, 2007 10:15 am

Oh don't worry. I'm not competing either, trust me.

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Postby Hustler » Sun Jul 29, 2007 10:09 am

ITALIANO wrote:
Hustler wrote:He could be even more intelligent than you.

Yes, it's possible. But it might not be evident from his posts.

Anyway, I´m not looking for a competition here. That´s your problem. Not mine.

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Postby Hustler » Sun Jul 29, 2007 10:06 am

LoL! You are defending yourself all the time. Open your mind!

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Postby ITALIANO » Sun Jul 29, 2007 9:54 am

Hustler wrote:He could be even more intelligent than you.

Yes, it's possible. But it might not be evident from his posts.

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Postby Hustler » Sun Jul 29, 2007 9:18 am

Fortunately, I can assure you that I have a minimal coefficient of intelligence that at least it allows me to understand the meaning of all the messages of this board. That means that also, fortunately, I understand your messages. What I do not understand are several things. First of all that you try to control a thread and all its posts. Secondly that you dedicate a thread to realize personal messages (sonyc youth and Magilla, according to your words) pretending who can interact here and who must skip.(Is it truth that Mussolini had died? Was he Bush´s friend?). Finally, it seems to me that if anybody wants to take part of a board it is necessary to have some attitudes that apparently you´ve missed them. And I´m going to give you a friendly advice too. You do not underestimate the person you really don´t know. He could be even more intelligent than you.

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Postby ITALIANO » Sun Jul 29, 2007 6:08 am

Since you obviously don't undertand what I write - my fault, of course - and you feel personally involved, well, my friendly advice would be to skip my posts. I can't spend all my time trying to make you understand my very simple points. Otherwise read them, but remember that they are not directed at you - they are usually more general, ok? And if you really have to reply, just realize that I already know perfectly well that you are not American. Of course, as you probably know, in this global era one doesn't need to be American to have (usually the worst aspects of) an American mentality.

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Postby Hustler » Sat Jul 28, 2007 8:18 pm

First of all, and I think you´ve been told last year. Don´t tell me please what I have to ignore or what I have to do.

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Postby ITALIANO » Sat Jul 28, 2007 7:01 pm

Damien wrote:[Actually. Lancaster was known to have quite an eye for young men, and often acted upon his penchant.

I didn't know this.

Hustler, I honestly don't care if you are American or not, ok? My posts are rarely, VERY rarely addressed at you. I was referring to Sonic Youth and Big Magilla who started this thread. Clear now? So when u see my posts just ignore them. Oh mamma mia! Anyway, I agree about Gruppo di Famiglia in un Interno; it is the - much better - original Italian title of Conversation Piece, which I've mentioned in this thread.

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Postby Damien » Sat Jul 28, 2007 4:10 pm

ITALIANO wrote:Lancaster's relationship with Visconti is especially interesting - Visconti most of the times loved to work with gay - or let's say "bisexual", though I hate this word - actors. Even when he chose American actors (and he loved American cinema, he was a fan of musicals and romantic comedies), it was men like Farley Granger or - though in the end they didn't make a movie together - Tab Hunter. Burt Lancaster was obviously completely different, and the two seemed to have nothing in common. Yet, he became - probably with Dirk Bogarde -Visconti's favorite actor, a close friend and, in this almost final movie, he was chosen by the director for this sad, uncompromising self-portrayal.

Actually. Lancaster was known to have quite an eye for young men, and often acted upon his penchant.
"Y'know, that's one of the things I like about Mitt Romney. He's been consistent since he changed his mind." -- Christine O'Donnell

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Postby Hustler » Sat Jul 28, 2007 2:45 pm

ITALIANO wrote:I'm glad to see that Americans can appreciate this true masterpiece - one of the great epic movies of Italian cinema, and one of the few film versions of great novels to be almost as good as its source (some say even better). As for Burt Lancaster, this is probably his best performance ever (with the possible exception of Atlantic City.

Once again, I´m not american. As for Lancaster´s best performance ever, I would add Grupo Di Famiglia In Un Interno.

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Postby Reza » Sat Jul 28, 2007 2:25 pm

Big Magilla wrote:Granger did become a stronger actor as he aged, but unfortunately he wasn't given much opportunity to prove it. He's still with us, though, having recently recorded commentaries for the DVD double-disc release of They Live by Night and Side Street.

He led an interesting ''event'' filled life as related in his recent autobiography.

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Postby Big Magilla » Sat Jul 28, 2007 12:56 pm

Soap opera isn't necessarily a negative term. The American Heritage dicitonary describes it simply as "a series of experiences characterized by dramatic displays of emotion."

A more negative term would be melodrama, which is described as "a drama, such as a play, film, or television program, characterized by exaggerated emotions, stereotypical characters, and interpersonal conflicts." There is nothing stereotypical about this film, but it does fit the description of a soap opera. That said, some of my favorite films are soap operas. This doesn't happen to be one of them, but I can see why others may have liked it more.

Perhaps I would have liked it more myself if the male lead had been played by an actor of more depth than Farley Granger. Granger was at his best playing naive young men caught up in circumstances beyond their control in such films as Rope, They Live by Night, Side Street and Strangers on a Train. Without spoiling the plot, I will simply say that here he is called on to do more and is not quite up to the task.

Granger did become a stronger actor as he aged, but unfortunately he wasn't given much opportunity to prove it. He's still with us, though, having recently recorded commentaries for the DVD double-disc release of They Live by Night and Side Street.

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Postby Penelope » Sat Jul 28, 2007 12:41 pm

Yeah, why should "soap opera" or "chick flick" be a bad thing? Some of the greatest movies ever made are soap operas/chick flicks (Peyton Place, Imitation of Life, Notting Hill, etc.).
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Postby ITALIANO » Sat Jul 28, 2007 7:16 am

Big Magilla wrote:you can see I am not the first to call it a soap opera.

Not the first AMERICAN to call it a soap opera - I have no doubts. Americans think in these terms, I know. In Europe we have a different approach to this movie (I could mention all the great reviews the film got, and from much more important critics than this Mr Weiler - but it'd be pointless of course), and honestly, I'm quite sure, a more correct one. I'm not saying that one has to find it a masterpiece - but "soap opera" is a (too easily used) expression which makes me cringe.


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