Evaluating the Nominees

For the films of 2013
ksrymy
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Re: Evaluating the Nominees

Postby ksrymy » Sun Mar 09, 2014 4:23 pm

mlrg wrote:Philomena - Not seen yet

And you're better off staying this way.
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Re: Evaluating the Nominees

Postby mlrg » Sun Mar 09, 2014 3:27 pm

Nebraska 9/10
Her 6/10
The Wolf of Wall Street 8/10
Gravity 7/10
12 Years a Slave 5/10
American Hustle 6/10
Captain Phillips 6/10
Dallas Buyers Club 7/10
Philomena - Not seen yet

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Re: Evaluating the Nominees

Postby Cinemanolis » Sat Mar 08, 2014 12:22 pm

PICTURE
1. Nebraska
2. Her
3. The Wolf of Wall Street
4. Gravity
5. 12 Years a Slave
6. Philomena
7. American Hustle
8. Captain Phillips
9. Dallas Buyers Club

ACTOR
1. Leonardo Di Caprio
2. Bruce Dern
3. Matthew McConaughey
4. Chiwetel Ejiofor
5. Christian Bale

ACTRESS
1. Cate Blanchett
2. Judi Dench
3. Meryl Streep
4. Amy Adams
5. Sandra Bullock

SUPPPORTING ACTOR
1. Michael Fassbender
2. Jared Leto
3. Barkhad Abdi
4. Jonah Hill
5. Bradley Cooper

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
1. June Squibb
2. Sally Hawkins
3. Jennifer Lawrence
4. Lupita Nyong'o
5. Julia Roberts

DIRECTOR
1. Alexander Payne
2. Martin Scorsese
3. Alfonso Cuaron
4. Steve McQueen
5. David Russell

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Re: Evaluating the Nominees

Postby anonymous1980 » Sat Mar 08, 2014 8:49 am

I don't know whether my standards are too low or if I'm some idiot but I actually liked all the nominees.

01. 12 Years a Slave = A
02. Gravity = A
03. The Wolf of Wall Street = A
---------------------------------------------
04. Her = A-
05. Philomena = A-
06. American Hustle = A-
-----------------------------------------------
07. Nebraska = B+
08. Captain Philips = B+
09. Dallas Buyers Club = B+

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Re: Evaluating the Nominees

Postby Sonic Youth » Sun Mar 02, 2014 6:26 pm

I'm just doing the Best Picture list. It's the most time-efficient way I can get my thoughts across about each film. Nos. 3-5 is virtually a 3-way tie, and I haven't seen Dallas Buyers Club.

Once again, you're a great bunch of guys to watch the Oscars with. Even if the show is dull, even if your favorites don't win, I hope everyone has fun tonight.

1. 12 Years a Slave
I've said my piece. A second viewing helped me appreciate - or at least notice - other's criticisms, and I still wish the first 30 minutes weren't so overstated (and that Brad Pitt had cast someone else in the Brad Pitt role). But boy, does it sneak up on you and gut you at the end. In the meantime, I focused on smaller touches, such as the perpetual audio mix of the locusts and the subtle way Ejiofor changes his accent during the course of the film. I will be very sad when it loses tonight.

2. The Wolf of Wall Street
Like watching the greatest virtuoso guitarist breathlessly solo for three hours. I'm talking about Scorsese, but Leonardo as well, all flash and astonishing virtuosity. And no, the movie doesn't glorify or excuse their behavior.... except in the odd scene or two where it does just that, unfortunately.

3. Captain Phillips
The first half was terrifically involving. Greengrass' documentary-on-speed method had never been put to such effective use. But I was exhausted rather than exhilarated by the end. That final stand-off really does goes on and on...

4. American Hustle
It pays its dividends in the last half hour, but coming from a writer-director whose movies are like the release of an extremely taut spring, it starts out surprisingly flaccid and unwieldy. Droll and lots of fun, but it rarely peaks. Lawrence may be doing a Bette Midler imitation and Cooper a Steve Buscemi imitation, but they're aces, and so is the entire supporting cast. The leads are a big hole. Christian Bale's performance grows tiresome, and Amy Adams - though a great photographic subject - doesn't give a performance.

5. Nebraska
Mister Tee says Nebraska is a great film; Eric says it's dreadful. I see their points. The central relationship is lovely, deeply felt and genuine. But initially it seemed like a view of the Midwest that condescended to preconceived notions of upper-class urbanites, and the B/W photography inspired by a guy who learned about Middle America through Dorothea Lange. Later, I learned that Alexander Payne was himself from Nebraska - born and bred. Very interesting, and retrospectively it gives the film some additional shadings. I'm willing to be wrong on this one.

6. Gravity
Almost a cinematic marvel. Beautiful and sometimes terrifying, but the rampant Hollywoodisms and obnoxious score keep it earthbound. And sometimes it comes off a little too self-aware of what a marvel it is.

7. Philomena
A model example of a well-made mediocrity, culture without art. Proof that it is precise editing, lighting and scoring (and Judi Dench) that can make an audience cry. Because the screenplay is a disgrace.

8. Her
I find Manic Pixies really hard to take. Depressive Pixies, like this film, are even more unbearable. This may be the first film I've wanted to punch.
"What the hell?"
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Re: Evaluating the Nominees

Postby Eric » Thu Feb 27, 2014 10:16 am

Sabin wrote:2) That's the first positive thing I've heard about it. How many of the nominees do you hate?

Just two -- Dallas Buyers Club and Nebraska -- but had it been the 10th nominee, I'd have ranked Osage alongside the very soft middle of the pack along with Philomena, Captain Phillips and American Hustle.

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Re: Evaluating the Nominees

Postby Sabin » Thu Feb 27, 2014 2:15 am

1) I'm not saying if a movie wins an award that means I'm going to like it. I'm saying if it wins something, I'll see it. I don't have time to watch everything anymore, so if I don't want to see it to begin with and I think it's going to end up a nomination seat-filler, I'll probably skip it. I still haven't seen Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close either.
2) That's the first positive thing I've heard about it. How many of the nominees do you hate?
3) Tracy is a chick name.
Philomena is one of the year's best Philomenas!

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Re: Evaluating the Nominees

Postby Eric » Wed Feb 26, 2014 11:00 pm

1) Since when has winning an award been a mark of whether you'll like a movie or not?
2) Osage, for all its many faults, has as much going for it as at least five of the best picture nominees.
3) You're a misogynist pig. Just like Tracy Letts.

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Re: Evaluating the Nominees

Postby Sabin » Wed Feb 26, 2014 8:16 pm

Well, I hear it's not very good and I don't have a lot of time these days. I'm pretty positive that it's not going to win anything, so why bother?
Philomena is one of the year's best Philomenas!

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Re: Evaluating the Nominees

Postby mojoe92 » Wed Feb 26, 2014 7:46 pm

Sabin,

May I ask you why you won't watch August?

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Re: Evaluating the Nominees

Postby Sabin » Wed Feb 26, 2014 3:08 pm

Best Picture
9. Philomena -- this is the first Stephen Frears movie that I've disliked. It's Stephen Daldry territory.
8. Dallas Buyers Club -- the more time I sit with it, the less I like it. It's a very swift movie with some terrific acting.
7. Captain Phillips -- it's not that it's the best Paul Greengrass film, but rather the best that a Paul Greengrass film can be. It's a riveting headline.
6. American Hustle -- the micro are in a war with the macro in David O. Russell's lastest. Every scene is of interest. Hell, every scene is a movie! And it ends up exhausting more than building.
5. Gravity -- not sure if I've written much about this one. Gravity desperately needed a different actress so we could know how seriously (or rather not) to take the ridiculous character arc. There is an artistry to the compositions that I can't not respond to with awe.
4. The Wolf of Wall Street -- the shortest three hour film I've ever seen. Incredibly funny in parts. Never quite finds much of anything to say beyond showing us the circus.
3. Nebraska -- coming off of The Descendants, which I found loathsome, I'm shocked at how much of his condescensions remains (yes, remains) in Nebraska, and yet the film still totally works.
2. Her -- I can't shake the feeling that I really want the Charlie Kaufman version, the one that dives into some sharper insights and is less flattering to the viewer. But such a gorgeous, humane vision!
1. 12 Years a Slave -- not the best film of the year, but this should win. I have some problems with it but the more I revisit it, they don't matter. What this film is doing is incredible.


Best Director
5. David O. Russell, American Hustle -- well, that's a sharp turn for me from last year. He's still my favorite guy at work.
4. Alexander Payne, Nebraska -- the stuff that works is the best film he's ever made. The stuff that doesn't is par for the course with this guy.
3. Martin Scorsese, The Wolf of Wall Street -- you know that old adage "Feels like the work of a younger man"? That.
2. Alfonso Cuaron, Gravity -- I can't begrudge his victory.
1. Steve McQueen, 12 Years a Slave -- ...it's just that what McQueen does is so much more.


Best Actor
5. Christian Bale, American Hustle -- American Hustle Handicap #1: Bale is fun, but too mookish for the romanticism the film needs.
4. Matthew McConaughey, Dallas Buyers Club -- the chiefest virtue is how idiosyncratic this performance feels, how in line it is with McConaughey's surge of character actordom.
3. Leonardo DiCaprio, The Wolf of Wall Street -- More than The Departed (which is a better performance), this feels like the performance of Adult Leo's career. Which is to say Leo doesn't go deep. I wish all Can I Has Oscar?s were this much fun.
2. Bruce Dern, Nebraska -- Performance of Career vs. Limitations of the Role.
1. Chiwetel Ejiofer, 12 Years a Slave -- by necessity of script, Solomon is rendered a bit passive in creation. At all points in the film, he is both POV character and active participant.


Best Actress
I will not watch Meryl Streep in August, Osage County.
4. Sandra Bullock, Gravity -- wrong actress for the part.
3. Judi Dench, Philomena -- wrong actress for the part.
2. Cate Blanchett, Blue Jasmine -- most ridiculous part of the year.
1. Amy Adams, American Hustle -- only credible choice. For the past few years, Amy Adams has underplayed her performances so that there's a touching, wounded edge linking her characters.


Best Supporting Actor
5. - 2. Barkhad Abdi, Michael Fassbender, Jonah Hill, & Jard Leto
No idea yet.
1. Bradley Cooper, American Hustle -- when American Hustle is good it feels like the movie of the year. That movie is the one that Bradley Cooper is in.



Best Supporting Actress
I will not watch Julia Roberts in August, Osage County.
4. Jennifer Lawrence, American Hustle -- it all comes down to whether or not you value American Hustle the whole vs. American Hustle the parts. I think she's a hoot that drags down the rest of the film.
3. June Squibb, Nebraska -- starts as the most wretched of creations: foul-mouthed granny. Finds notes of honesty within said foul-mouthed granny.
2. Sally Hawkins, Blue Jasmine -- the performance of the film is still a woman written by Woody Allen.
1. Lupita Nyong'o, 12 Years a Slave -- those Jared Leto/Lupita Nyong'o dating rumors are interesting because the internet doesn't know what to do with either one of them.


Best Original Screenplay
5. Blue Jasmine -- there are some dumb ideas in this script.
4. Dallas Buyers Club -- convinces me of McConaughey's Oscar win.
3. American Hustle -- I want to sit David O. Russell down and make him basically erase Jennifer Lawrence's character from the script and see what we get instead.
2. Her -- the weakest part of a beautiful film.
1. Nebraska -- very quietly the most beautifully written film of the bunch.


Best Adapted Screenplay
5. Philomena -- overly reverential about its main character; is about nothing. When Steve Coogan brings out "The Real Philomena" at the Golden Globes? Feels like that moment throughout the entire film.
4. Captain Phillips -- what can you say when the best line in the script wasn't written?
3. The Wolf of Wall Street -- funny story, I read this script two years ago. Looked nothing like this.
2. 12 Years a Slave -- the weakest aspect of the film. The third act needed some work. But beautiful language and one of the most gripping films of the year.
1. Before Midnight -- man, is there really no way this can't win?! Balls...
Philomena is one of the year's best Philomenas!

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Re: Evaluating the Nominees

Postby Big Magilla » Wed Feb 26, 2014 3:05 pm

flipp525 wrote:Check out the Slant description in my post in the "Category-by-Category: Best Supporting Actress" thread for a pretty on-point description of what Squibb is actually doing in Nebraska.


That's the way the part was written.

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Re: Evaluating the Nominees

Postby flipp525 » Wed Feb 26, 2014 1:10 pm

Olympia Dukakis would've been all wrong for the role. She has not even the slightest whiff of Midwestern frau about her. Face it, June Squibb was exquisite. One of the best of a stronger-than-usual lineup this year.

Check out the Slant description in my post in the "Category-by-Category: Best Supporting Actress" thread for a pretty on-point description of what Squibb is actually doing in Nebraska.
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Re: Evaluating the Nominees

Postby Big Magilla » Wed Feb 26, 2014 1:06 pm

I didn't say that June Squibb wasn't Gloria Stuart in Titanic. I said she wasn't Gloria Stuart period. Gloria Stuart was never a great actress, but she was a good one with a number of interesting performances in the 1930s who was also interesting as an old lady in Titanic. It kind of made me (and others) wish there had been other roles in-between. June Squibb evokes no such wishes. I know several old ladies who could have played that part just as effectively, but not as effectively as an Olympia Dukakis, certainly not a Maggie Smith who would have been all wrong for such a role.

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Re: Evaluating the Nominees

Postby flipp525 » Wed Feb 26, 2014 1:03 pm

Big Magilla wrote:4. [June Squibb]'s no Gloria Stuart.

You're right; she's better.
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